Deep Tissue Massage and Cancer

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Deep Tissue Massage and Cancer

by Alisa_B on Fri Jul 30, 2004 12:00 AM

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I have been given conflicting information as to whether a cancer patient can have deep tissue massage. Some say it is OK, and others say it can stimulate the cancer cells in the body. I'd appreciate it others sharing their knowledge on this subject.

Deep Tissue Massage

by Lynda_D on Wed Aug 04, 2004 12:00 AM

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I have been told by an RN who is also does deep tissue massage that it can be a bad thing for those who have cancer. The RN stated that it would cause the spread of cancer cells. I have lung cancer (3rd time) and I was getting massages until the cancer came back. Now I get a cranio (head) massage instead to open up my spinal fluids to flow correctly and to help with the fighting of my cancer. Has anyone else heard on this subject?

Deep Massage Therapy

by Solespirits on Sat Nov 20, 2004 12:00 AM

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Hello, I am a practitioner in complementary medicine and work exclusively with all stages of cancer. I would not suggest deep tissue massage as it is likely to make the receiver uncomfortable. We always suggest if massage can be tolerated to have a gentle or light massage and avoiding any recent scar tissue or tumor areas. Otherwise massage has been very successful anecdotally and with research for use with oncology patients and those in pallative care including reflexology, cranial of gentle head massage and the use of aromatherapy. Some essential oils have proved successful in research for cancer patients providing relaxation and in very rare cases reducing tumors. The benefit of the comfort of the person with cancer is paramount and gentle massage will do no harm as it will provide other benefits and will not spread cancer.

Essential Oils

by Rose_123 on Sun Sep 04, 2005 12:00 AM

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Hi, I have seen essential oil treatments that are wonderful without cancer and because the oils oxygenate the cells and the pressures for massage are not there, I think they would be comforting to people. Any thoughts? rose btw all essential oils are not precess the same way. For this one can only use steam processed oils.

Deep Tissue Massage

by Solespirits on Sun Sep 04, 2005 12:00 AM

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In response to any massage deep or otherwise it has contributed well in response to many oncology /cancer patients. I am a university lecturer and work closely with a cancer clinic and cancer charity and perform and supervise students working with clients with various types of cancer. It is now acknowledged that any form of massage will not spread cancer. However, the massage should be performed by a suitably qualified, insured therapist or practitioner that has experience working with oncology clients. It must be mentioned however, that there are possible contra-indications to massage where it would not be performed. For example over a recently radiated area, tumour, sore or cut area or o9n a recently operated area, etc. Although current research in France is using oils on areas that are to be radiated on and our own clients receive treatments, before and after receiving radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy, which has been found to relax clients and reduce some of the after effects/symptoms they normally get following treatments. All clients who are about to receive any form of treatment will have a consultation with the therapist/practitioner and a complete medical history taken and consent form before any treatment takes place. At present we are conducting much needed research and clinical audits with a view on complementary medicine used on cancer clients with much success. Indeed the areas of practice we use are massage, aromatherapy, reflexology, manual lymph drainage and indian head massage. Any form of complementary medicine is a good adjunct with regular and conventional medical treatments. It will do no harm providing you consult with a qualified therapist. However, any form of massage, etc will not bring a cure, but it will help with relaxation and other quality of life issues to help make things more bearable and aid recovery of the condition. I hope this has helped answer your question. It will do no harm if done professionally an in the right hands. Cancer charities are now offering cancer patients much more in the way of comfort with the use of complementary medicine. Best wishes Beverley W., England

Indian Head Massage ?

by The_Hug_Guy on Sat Oct 15, 2005 12:00 AM

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I had cancer in May 2000 and thought it was gone after radiation seeding. Now it has returned in '05 and gone to the bones. I'm juicing carrots and veggies with a Green Star juicer, drinking 10 glasses of water daily, and have become a vegan. I exercise. Oncologist sent me home to die in hospice Aug '05 but guess what? I'm feeling fine and walk two miles daily.... Massage is very helpful, but of course common sense would tell you not to irritate tumors or recent surgery. Have you seen www.drday.com ? She is an MD that had a grapefruit size cancer, shown on website, that has been gone 9 years and she had no chemo, radiation, or mastectomy. She makes a good case for God's plan for recovery. Greg Anderson had lung cancer and in 1982 was given 30 days to live. I saw him about 2002 in Pa. and he is fully recovered. Check out his free books and website. This reminds me of the doctor who told his patient: I have bad news and good news. The bad news is that you have only 6 months to live. The good news is that the bill is only $5000. "But I don't have $5000" was the response. OK, doctor said, I'll give you 12 months to live..... Now, somebody please tell me what is indian head massage? I need to know. Thanks for your help. Stan,age 74 --- Message edited by CancerCompass staff: for personal protection, email address removed. Please review CancerCompass Member Guidelines at http://www.cancercompass.com/common/guidelines.html ---

Indian Head Massage

by Solespirits on Sun Oct 16, 2005 12:00 AM

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Hi Hug guy, Indian head massage is as it says it is, a head massage that incorporates the head, neck, shoulders and back, with its origins from India. It has been passed down for generations and remains a part of most Indian families lives. It came to the west with migrating Indian families and has become a useful part of the many complementary therapies in use today. It can take as little as 20 minutes or up to 45 mins to an hour. The beauty of this massage is you do not have to remove any clothing to have it performed and you can sit in an ordinary chair. Its main purpose is for relaxation and as it engages the circulation does lend itself to other therapeutic feelings and benefits. As with any massage it is best to avoid areas where a tumour or operation/treatments have recently presented itself on the body. The massage itself would be no more irritating, or move any form of the cancer around the body, than if you were regularly exercising or moving around on a daily basis. As with any treatment you wish to undertake it is always best to consult your doctor. I hope this has been of some assistance. We have had many good results with the use of complementary therapies with many of our oncology patients, who are are under medical supervision. It is certainly very nice and relaxing and should be very comforting if nothing else transpires from a treatment. To get the best benefits please see a qualified therapist.

RE: Deep Tissue Massage

by ceejay2005 on Thu Dec 18, 2008 12:00 AM

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I am a massage therapist and I had cancer. A massage always feels good. I say go for it. Some argue that it can make the cancer spread. The chemo is going to kill the cancer. And I am sure she had the tumor removed. I got them as much as possible because it made me feel good.

http://doctorfinders.com/doctors-phoenix-az.html

RE: Deep Tissue Massage

by hands4healing on Mon Feb 02, 2009 12:00 AM

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I am a certified massage therapist with specialized training in massage for people living with cancer. One of the first things you learn as you study massage and oncology is that massage does not spread cancer. Instead, massage that is appropriately modified for the individual patient, taking into consideration their medical history, cancer treatment and side effects, can provide great comfort and relief. I work in hospitals, clinics and provide massage at home for those unable to come to me -- in nearly every case, massage has been a blessing. Be sure to work with a certified therapist with special training who always elicits the support of the treating doctor before creating a massage session for you. It may be that you can only receive a light and nurturing touch from your therapist, but even that can be a healing experience.

RE: Deep Tissue Massage

by drstilldc on Sat May 26, 2012 08:07 PM

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I agree with you. as a chiropractor inLongview, WA massage- http://www.drstilldc.com -is something i reccomend to my patients when they are battling cancer. I tihnk that with the seriousness of cancer really anything you can do to help your chances is going te be great. It is so important to find somebody who does have training and can give you the best treatment.

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