Alcohol and Chemo

3 Posts | Page(s): 1 

Alcohol and Chemo

by smittykat on Fri Nov 09, 2007 12:00 AM

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Hi,

My father was just diagnosed with extensive small cell cancer. It began as lung but has spread to his liver and bones. He has always been a heavy drinker (more than 3 drinks an evening--every evening) and although he stopped drinking after he was diagnosed, he’s begun his regular routine of drinking again. I’m worried of the affects it might have on his chemo treatments as well as the medication he is on.

 

I’ve searched and searched for some information on the affects of chemo and alcohol and not really finding anything.

 

Can someone help me find some good information that I  can share with my Dad so that I  can get him to stop drinking?

 

Thanks so much!

Stephanie

--Message edited by CancerCompass staff. For personal protection, email address removed. Consider private reply. Please review CancerCompass Member Guidelines at http://www.cancercompass.com/common/guidelines.html--

 

RE: Alcohol and Chemo

by Becky55 on Thu Nov 27, 2008 12:00 AM

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Just speaking from experience dealing with my sister who has the same kind of cancer your dad has, nothing you can say will stop them from doing what they want. They have such a short time with that kind of cancer, you need to give up the preaching and spend all the time you can with your dad. Believe me...I have been going thru the same thing with my sister plus she is smoking a pack a day. It makes me sick...but its her life and if thats makes her happy,so be it. I even go get her at 3:00 in the morning so she wont drive home. I dont care where she is at...if I can help her out I do. Everyday she has is a blessing to me and that is all you can do for your dad. just be there for him. My sister went into remission drinking every nite and smoking with sclc spread to her bones and lymph nodes. I still cant believe it... 

RE: Alcohol and Chemo

by jcr65566 on Thu Nov 27, 2008 12:00 AM

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On 11/9/2007 smittykat wrote:

Hi,

My father was just diagnosed with extensive small cell cancer. It began as lung but has spread to his liver and bones. He has always been a heavy drinker (more than 3 drinks an evening--every evening) and although he stopped drinking after he was diagnosed, he’s begun his regular routine of drinking again. I’m worried of the affects it might have on his chemo treatments as well as the medication he is on.

 

I’ve searched and searched for some information on the affects of chemo and alcohol and not really finding anything.

 

Can someone help me find some good information that I  can share with my Dad so that I  can get him to stop drinking?

 

Thanks so much!

Stephanie

--Message edited by CancerCompass staff. For personal protection, email address removed. Consider private reply. Please review CancerCompass Member Guidelines at http://www.cancercompass.com/common/guidelines.html--

 


Hi to me small cell cancer is usually always cause by smoking and liver cancer cause by drinking can you tell me how old your dad is cheers Ray

sorry about the pun this is from two sites I found I hope it helps the only thing I can see is alcohol will dilate the blood vessels, (make the blood vessels bigger) but I cant find any more on it that sutable as  yet if I do Ill let you know  Ill say take  care this time  Ray   

http://www.caring.com/questions/drinking-on-chemotherapy

There are two main dangers of drinking alcohol (assuming you're talking about small amounts of social drinking and not severe intoxication) during chemotherapy: the sedative effects and the effects on the liver. 1) Many medications can cause sedation including, among others, pain medications, anti-anxiety meds, anti-nausea meds, anti-histamines, some psychiatric meds and sleeping pills of course. The danger is that the sedative effects of the alcohol will be added to those of the other drugs so you'd sleep much too long or even, in extreme cases, stop breathing altogether. So while not specifically dealing with the chemotherapy, this can be a problem with other medications that the patient may be taking.

2) The liver is necessary to clean the body of many medications, including chemotherapy. Alcohol can interfere with the liver's ability to do its job and the patient can suffer. For this reason, when in doubt, don't drink alcohol.


There is also some question about whether alcohol may reduce the efficacy of some chemo medications. So if it's important to you to drink while undergoing chemotherapy, ask your doctor if that's okay, and ask there are any limits as to amount and timing.

http://www.caring4cancer.com/go/community/nursescorner/nurse

 

While I’m on chemo, can I still have a glass of wine or a beer with dinner?

 

Ask a Question

Q: While I’m on chemotherapy, can I still have a glass of wine or a beer with dinner? 

A: Drinking alcohol—whether wine, beer, or liquor—may interfere with some chemotherapy drugs and can cause dehydration. Find out from your doctor or others on your health care team if having one drink with dinner is okay with the chemotherapy medication you’re taking. We tell our patients not to have alcohol the day before, day of, and day after chemotherapy.

Alcohol also can worsen some chemotherapy side effects, such as mouth sores. If the mouth becomes sore, alcohol can cause burning and additional dryness of the mouth. Some patients report that taste changes from chemotherapy or radiation to the head and neck make alcohol less enjoyable.

If it doesn’t conflict with your treatment medication, having a drink with dinner might help you relax and improve your appetite. But limit yourself to one drink. Excessive drinking is dangerous. Be sure your doctor knows the amount of alcohol you were drinking before treatment began, so you can get help with cutting back now if needed.
--Kathy Newman, RN, BSN

If you’re experiencing an upset stomach or nausea from chemotherapy, try a soothing cup of homemade ginger tea between or during meals.

 

 

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