Vietnam Veterans

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Vietnam Veterans

by Susan4951 on Tue Nov 11, 2008 12:00 AM

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Just wondering if there are any Vietnam veterans on this site.  My late husband had esophageal cancer and I believe his came from exposure to Agent Orange.

 

Thanks

RE: Vietnam Veterans

by Phil_A on Tue Nov 11, 2008 12:00 AM

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I am a Vietnam vet who served 67-68 tet. I was diagnosed with EC July 2007 had chemo/rad and then esophagectomy Jan. 08 . I have filed for service connection for exposure to agent orange but was denied. Their is a bill before congress that will be voted on after the New Year when Congress is back in session. The bill no. I believe is 6578 to do with EC cancer. You can obtain this info through your congressman office or contact the DAV or any of the service officers out there. Phil A.

RE: Vietnam Veterans

by Susan4951 on Tue Nov 11, 2008 12:00 AM

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Hi Phil,

 

I hope this message finds you doing well from your cancer.  Yes, I am familiar with that bill.  It is H. R. 6798 but will be reintroduced under a different number I think.  You can track it at WashingtonWatch.com and also comment on it if you like.

I really think that with all the trouble at the VA there might be a good chance that this bill will pass.  It has reached the threshold of presumption and the VA can add it now if they choose to.  Esophageal cancer is in the inadequate or insufficient evidence catagory now which means there is not enough evidence to make a decision.  My case is at the appeals in Washington and has been since early March 2007.  Keep your claim open...file a notice of disagreement..send more evidence or just appeal like I did. 

 

If you have any questions, let me know.  I'll be glad to help in anyway that I can.

 

Susan from South Carolina

 

 

RE: Vietnam Veterans

by Phil_A on Tue Nov 11, 2008 12:00 AM

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I have already appealed the EC denial with my DAV rep. in Providence, R.I. I just won another appeal at the BVA for Peripheral Neuropathy related to Agent Orange of both upper and lower extremities back in June of this year and await my other BVA appeal for vertigo which was given by an ENT VA Doctor in Providence. I now sit and wait for the Washington crew to send it back to the RO for a percentage. I am already a 100% DAV and the PN case was filed back in 2004 and I will continue filing cases as problems develope due to AO exposure. I due this for the other vets, so maybe their cases will be won and for the families who have lost a love one. I wish you the best on your case and all others fighting the VA regarding AO.  Phil A.

RE: Vietnam Veterans

by jcr65566 on Tue Nov 11, 2008 12:00 AM

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On 11/11/2008 Susan4951 wrote:

Just wondering if there are any Vietnam veterans on this site.  My late husband had esophageal cancer and I believe his came from exposure to Agent Orange.

 

Thanks


Hi Susan though I didn’t go to Vietnam I served with the Australian Army 1972 to 1975 we trained in fields sprayed with the stuff later I got sick and didn’t know why but I developed CFS Iv been sick until I found out I had prostrate cancer all the vitamins C and the other stuff I was on I begin to feel a little better then I had been for years I’m now back on higher dose of minerals and vitamin C and D I stop for a while as I  started using  the bob beck protocol it had little or no effect until I started going  back on even higher dose of minerals and vitamins it then started to work you know  for 15 years I was only ably to stand for and hour or so, than I had to sit down because the sharp pain in my legs got so bad  I also use to sweet all the time. Now  I feel ever thing gone back to normal  I don’t sweet any more and my leg feel grate. I ask my doctor about this he said it the high dose of minerals and the vitamins I’m on all I know is it working the bit below is  copy from ther wikipedia site cheers Ray

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agent_Orange

Agent Orange is the code name for a powerful herbicide and defoliant used by the U.S. military in its Herbicidal Warfare program during the Vietnam War. During the Vietnam War, an estimated 80 000 m³ of Agent Orange was sprayed across South Vietnam.[1]

Agent Orange's usage from 1961 to 1971 was by far the most used of the so-called "Rainbow Herbicides" used during the program. Degradation of Agent Orange (as well as Agents Purple, Pink, and Green) released dioxins, which have caused health problems for those exposed during the Vietnam War. Agents Blue and White were part of the same program but did not contain dioxins.

Studies of populations exposed to dioxin, though not necessarily agent orange, indicate increased risk of various types of cancer and genetic defects; the effect of long-term low-level exposure has not been established.

Since the 1980s, several lawsuits have been filed against the companies which produced agent orange, among them; Dow Chemical, Monsanto, and Diamond Shamrock (which produced 5%[2]). U.S. veterans obtained a $180 million settlement in 1984, with most affected veterans receiving a one-time lump sum payment of $1,200. According to the Department of Veterans Affairs, shortly after the Vietnam War veterans reported various health complications which can be traced to exposure to the chemical Agent Orange. The Department of Veterans Affairs responded by providing health care services, disability compensation, and scientific research and education for these veterans. [3]

American veterans of the Vietnam war were seeking recognition of agent orange syndrome, compensation and treatment for diseases that they and their children suffered from; many exposed to agent orange have not been able to receive promised medical care through the Veterans Administration medical system, and only with rare exception have their affected children received healthcare assistance from the government. With the production of Agent Orange, dioxins are created as a by-product. These dioxins are known to be deadly. Humans often show symptoms of dioxin poisoning when exposed to the contaminant. This could possibly explain Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) in the children of veterans exposed to Agent Orange. They are four times more likely to suffer from SIDS than other infants. [4]

Vietnam veterans and their families who brought the original agent orange lawsuit 25 years ago alleged that the government "is just waiting for us all to die". They alleged that most of those still alive would succumb to the effects of toxic exposure before the age of 65.

In Australia, Canada and New Zealand, veterans obtained compensation in settlements that same year. In 1999, South Korean veterans filed a lawsuit in the Korean courts. In January 2006, the Korean Appeal Court ordered Monsanto and Dow to pay US$62 million in compensation. However, no Vietnamese have received compensation, and on March 10, 2006, Judge Jack B. Weinstein of the United States District Court for the Eastern District of New York dismissed the lawsuit filed by the Vietnamese victims of agent orange against the chemical companies which produced the defoliants and herbicides.

 

Polychlorinated dibenzodioxins (PCDDs), or simply dioxins, are a group of halogenated organic compounds which are significant because they act as environmental pollutants. They are commonly referred to as dioxins for simplicity in scientific publications because every PCDD molecule contains a dioxin skeletal structure. Typically, the p-dioxin skeleton is at the core of a PCDD molecule, giving the molecule a dibenzo-p-dioxin ring system. Members of the PCDD family have been shown to bioaccumulate in humans and wildlife due to their lipophilic properties, and are known teratogens, mutagens, and suspected human carcinogens.

 

 

Bioaccumulation occurs when an organism absorbs a toxic substance at a rate greater than that at which the substance is lost. Thus, the longer the biological half-life of the substance the greater the risk of chronic poisoning, even if environmental levels of the toxin are very low. Generally, bioaccumulation occurs at the same rate as energy moving through trophic levels, about 10% buildup per level.

This is one reason why chronic poisoning is a common aspect of environmental health in the workplace. As people spend so much time, for so many months in these environments, very low levels of toxins can be lethal over time.

 

 

 

RE: Vietnam Veterans

by vietnam_vet_widow on Tue Nov 11, 2008 12:00 AM

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HR 6798 will expire with this session of congress if not passed soon

Congressman Kagen has indicated that he will reintroduce it next session.  We need to encourage other congressmen/women to support his efforts on our behalf.

Other information is available at www.thomas.gov  where you can insert the bill number an read it.  If you click update it will tell you who the other co-sponsors are.

We need an all out effort to get this past and to bring justice to those vietnam veterans who served and paid/paying a price with their health by being good americans.

One agent orange widow 

 

 

RE: Vietnam Veterans

by allpoos on Wed Nov 12, 2008 12:00 AM

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Hello All,

My husband passed away on Nov. 13, 2006 from EC.  He was diagnosed in Nov. 2004.  He was a Vietnam vet and served over there during the Tet Offensive as well. He continued to serve for 30 years.  I was able to be approved for DIC because of his hiatal hernia and GERD.  I had a very good advocate at the VA who helped with the submission.  I believe he contracted the EC due to his exposure to AO but as all of you know, it's so hard to prove.  The new vets from current wars will be dealing with the same problems.  I wish all of you well.

RE: Vietnam Veterans

by allpoos on Wed Nov 12, 2008 12:00 AM

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I forgot to mention in my previous post that I found an interesting report titled "REPORT TO THE SECRETARY OF THE DEPT. OF VETERANS AFFAIRS ON THE ASSOCIATION BETWEEN ADVERSE HEALTH EFFECTS AND EXPOSURE TO AGENT ORANGE"  dated May 5, 1990. I found it at www.gulfwarvets.com.

RE: Vietnam Veterans

by mjc1099 on Wed Dec 03, 2008 12:00 AM

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Please help.. I don't know where to begin in seeking help with the VA.  I was dignosised  with Carcinoid cancer back in 1990.  I have had several surgeries to remove effected body parts. I also developed a condition called Carcionid Symdrome. At this time, the doctors have listed me as terminal.  I have attempted to get my VA disability and have been denied for 100%.

I am a Viet Nam veteran and was exposed to Agent Orange.  The VA's position is that it is my responsibility to prove that the Carcinoid Cancer  is related to Agent Orange exposure. Their premise is that Carcinoid Cancer is a rare form of cancer not affecting a great number of people and research is minimal. Several doctors have informed me that this cancer is related to exposure to dioxins used in AgentOrange.

I am currently appealing their denial, but my time is running out.  Any advise you may have would be greatly appreciated.

One VA doctor wrote a letter to VA requesting expediting the appeals process due to my terminal condition.  This has had no affect.

My efforts are motivated for my two teenage sons and wife. 

 

RE: Vietnam Veterans

by Phil_A on Wed Dec 03, 2008 12:00 AM

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I would contact my Congressmam and Senator about your case and see if some pressure can be applied. Please go to www.vawatchdog.org  and read post by Strickland, these are  all write in cases and give him a try he is excellant with results and good luck . Another nam vet totally disabled by Agent Orange.  Phil A.
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