IVOR LEWIS

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IVOR LEWIS

by imnlpngirl on Tue Feb 03, 2009 12:00 AM

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Hello to everyone...

My husband had Ivor Lewis on last Monday and then they had to go back in on Tuesday to take more of his stomach than they had thought that they would.  He does have a J tube.  Things are progressing slowly.  I wanted to see if anyone else had the similar operations and if so would mind giving me some insight on what to expect from this point.  Any information is greatly apprciated!

God Bless!

RE: IVOR LEWIS

by Cyclist on Wed Feb 04, 2009 12:00 AM

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On 2/3/2009 imnlpngirl wrote:

Hello to everyone...

My husband had Ivor Lewis on last Monday and then they had to go back in on Tuesday to take more of his stomach than they had thought that they would.  He does have a J tube.  Things are progressing slowly.  I wanted to see if anyone else had the similar operations and if so would mind giving me some insight on what to expect from this point.  Any information is greatly apprciated!

God Bless!


Hi imnipngirl, (I gotta ask what that means)

Several of us on this board have had the same operation. I even had to have a follow up operation, 8 days later, to see if my bowel being twisted was keeping me from swallowing. (It wasn't. I just needed more time to heal.) This was all back in mid-2005.

It is still very early for your husband. If by "last Monday" you mean Jan 26, that's only 9 days. Progress is usually very slow after an I-L surgery. I went home in 18 days. It's usually a little sooner for most people.  Your husband will have to be patient. After he gets home, he'll need to eat very small meals, 5-6 times a day, avoiding sugars and most fats. (I kept the j-tube in when I went home, just in case, but never used it.) He'll need to rest a lot. My surgeon told me to move all that I could. I took that literally and to the extreme, but stll saved time to rest.  I believe that was helpful.

What happens varies so much from person to person that it's hard to say what will happen for your husband. He may progress very quickly, it could be slow.I suggest you stay in touch with this board, let us all know how things are going, and ask what questions come up as things progress.

Please, keep in touch.

Good Luck, KEEP MOVING, and Laugh Much,

Steve

 

RE: IVOR LEWIS

by Ever4015 on Wed Feb 04, 2009 12:00 AM

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On 2/3/2009 imnlpngirl wrote:

Hello to everyone...

My husband had Ivor Lewis on last Monday and then they had to go back in on Tuesday to take more of his stomach than they had thought that they would.  He does have a J tube.  Things are progressing slowly.  I wanted to see if anyone else had the similar operations and if so would mind giving me some insight on what to expect from this point.  Any information is greatly apprciated!

God Bless!

Hello imnlpngirl:

I had Ivor Lewis on Aug. 14, 2008 and had a few complications. My heart raced twice and my J tube came out of my bowel and causes a lot of pain as the feedings were going around my bowels instead of into them, so they pulled the J tube and I had to eat on my own. At first it was a liquid diet, then a soft diet and after 6 to 8 weeks, I gradually ate regularly once more. It was a lot of throwing up for the first little while until my new digestive system learned to eat again. But you need to eat more often and less, cause if you don't you have a lot of problems. Each day it does get better and some people recover quicker then others, I was back to work 3mths after my operation, but since then until now I have been able to only work 1 full week, the other weeks it has been 3 to 4 days, so I am still healing. My doctor says it will take at least a year for me to get all my energy back and feel reasonable. It is a long recovery, but worth it in the long run. Many people have been very helpful and I had a lot of questions, as I am sure you will, so please ask away and we will help all we can. Please keep us informed of your husband's progress. And if I can assist in questions no problems.

Take Care and Be Positive

Evelyn

 

RE: IVOR LEWIS

by Bruce_F on Fri Feb 13, 2009 12:00 AM

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On 2/3/2009 imnlpngirl wrote:

Hello to everyone...

My husband had Ivor Lewis on last Monday and then they had to go back in on Tuesday to take more of his stomach than they had thought that they would.  He does have a J tube.  Things are progressing slowly.  I wanted to see if anyone else had the similar operations and if so would mind giving me some insight on what to expect from this point.  Any information is greatly apprciated!

God Bless!


Hi imnlpngirl,

I am a seven year survivor (11/01) of this surgery. I was diagnosed with adenocarcinoma at age 37, quite uncommon for that age. My surgery lasted nearly 12 hours, my hospital stay was 15 days (prolonged a bit due to my right collapsing when I came out of ICU) and my home recovery was nearly 5 months before I returned to work. I went home with the j-tube, which was removed approximately 3 weeks later. I had all but one inch of my esophagus removed causing the need to connect this remaining piece to a plastic tube and then to remaining 2/3rd's of my stomach. 1/3rd of my stomach was removed for the gastric pull-through portion of this surgery.

Recovery is slow and sometimes very frustrating. 7 years later I live a fairly normal life, although I still suffer from reflux for which I will take medication for the rest of my life. I go in next Thursday (2/19/09) for my annual endoscopy and hopefully all turns out well again. I am able to eat a pretty normal diet and excercise in moderation. I enjoy golf and am able to play without a problem.

During the past 7 years, I have had surgery to repair five ventral hernias (12/04) which I understand are not uncommon after a radical esopahgectomy and most recently (12/08) I had to have my gall bladder removed. This surgery had to be performed the traditional "open" way as opposed to the less invasive laproscopic surgery due to the extensive/radical procedure that an esophagectomy is.

Anyway, my advice for you both is to take things slow, ask as many questions as you can and never, ever feel like you are complaining or burdening anyone. Cancer is very scary, not only for the person suffering with it but also for their family and friends. Know that you both have many support options available to you and although some may not believe - the POWER OF PRAYER is amazing!

Both you and your husband are in my prayers - God Bless. - Bruce F.

RE: IVOR LEWIS

by Kodismom on Wed May 06, 2009 12:00 AM

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Hi. 

I came across this site and saw your message in February.  My husband was diagnosed with esophageal cancer in March.  He has gone through all the chemo and radiation treatments.  He is scheduled for his PET scan in a couple of weeks.  They are anticipating the Ivor Lewis esophagectomy in mid June.  I was wondering how your husband is doing now and trying to anticipate what to expect during and after surgery.  My husband is 61 yrs old and in excellent shape (although has lost 40 lbs since beginning of treatment).  If you or anyone else can respond with some input, I would appriciate it.  We met with the surgeon on Monday and I'm understanding that my husband will no longer have a stomach after this surgery.  This is such a scary thing to deal with and I'm not quite sure how all this will be after surgery.  I hope your husband is doing well.

 Thank you,

Judy

RE: IVOR LEWIS

by imnlpngirl on Wed May 06, 2009 12:00 AM

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Hello,

My husband actually had to have two surgeries.  The tumor roots were further down than had actually shown on the scans.  He never had radiation, so I think that will help in your husbands case.

As it turned out my husband did fairly well with the surgeries, although it did take longer for he to get stronger because there were several complications.

Since he did have to have two surgeries, our case is a lot different then the cases I have heard about here.  It seems like most people have done really well.  I wish you and your husband the VERY best of outcomes.

Take care!!    Amy

RE: IVOR LEWIS

by flitter721 on Mon Aug 10, 2009 12:00 AM

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Hello,

I read your message today and wonder how you and your husband are doing since the surgery? Has he gotten home? I know it is such a hard thing to go through becasue my father just had the surgery on July 23rd. He has been in the ICU ever since due to numerous complications. His right lung collapsed, had pneumonia, a staph, vagus nerve damage, had to go on a ventilator and had a tracheostomy a few days ago. I hope he will get out of the ICU this week. He is so weak now it took five nurses to put him in a chair today. He is a fit 67 year old with a fighting spirit. They are talking about putting him in a rehab facility after the hospital to help with speech and physical therapy. This sounds like a good idea to me....People keep telling me that adjusting to getting out of the hospital can be really hard and I am just wondering what kinds of things to expect and what we can do to make it easier.

I sincerely hope things have improved for you!

All the best,

flitter721

 

RE: IVOR LEWIS

by kaarina on Sat Apr 16, 2011 05:17 AM

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Hi,

I had Ivor Lews operation on february this year and am still recovering. I know that it takes about 4 months until the patient begins to feel more or less well again, and about 6 months when the patient starts to feel normal. I have been told that I will live a normal life after about 6 months. My surgeon is well known and I was told before the operation that he never operates to accumulate work, in other words he is a best standard Professor in his area of medicine. But, I still have a good day, full of vitality and lots of energy, eating well, and then I can hardly get up the next and feel nauseus again. The urine is after a more active day dark and I have motion sickness like headaches and can't watch tv or read much. This is a kind of a current norm. I know that everyone is an individual with their bodies, but if I have been any help, let me know. Today I began searching, for the first time, the survival time spans of IV patients, and have found one who is still doing well after 7 years. THAT made me feel well, although I don't fear death itself. The reason for survival search is that I will fly to the other side of the world after the 6 months from the op, is over, and I wonder how will I go about that, including foods I will be offered once I am in my destination. It is worth mentioning that I survived thyroid cancer that was diagnosed in 2003 and removed. I then had Isotope 13 treatment and after that the first scan revealed that I had isotope in the oesophagus, where it shouldn't had been, tests then revealed that I had Hiatus hernia that allowed too much stomach acids into my food pipe and I have taken medication ever since. Endoscopies, first once a year 2004 , then twice a year and finally ablation treatments in 2010 led to the cancer discovery, so basically my OC is due to stomach acids. I concetrate on foods that don't stir the stomach acids too much and are nutritious.Drinki ng has been a problem at times, when I am really thirsty I opt for cold milk and also for slices of WATERMELON, cold, and that works nutritionally very well.

I came home with a J tube, and was explained that because of the flushing of the tube, which often is also done too fast, it is not safe to remove the tube too soon after the feeding through it is over. The lower body has to adjust to more normal circumtances before J can come off. My tube actually fell off by itself, stitch and all, due to so many dressing changes around it, and I just saw it on the bathroom floor and was able to take it to the surgeon the following day, he said that no harm was done, and that was a good day, because my log about the drain in the back also proved that the drain can come off as well. I was a free woman from all hospital gadgets and the healing really kicked in after that. Yet, like I mwentined, it is one vital day, and one slow day, like a pattern, but the vital days are getting stronger. I hope that I have been helpfull,

Rest, have peace of mind and enjoy the nature, am sure you do, and may God bless you and your family.

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