radiation damage to bones

8 Posts | Page(s): 1 

radiation damage to bones

by lisaann on Wed Feb 04, 2009 12:00 AM

Quote | Reply

Hi Everyone,

I posted this same message under "rectal cancer" also (which is what I actually have).  I'm wondering if any of you who have had radiation on your colon/rectal tumor have suffered any pain or problems with your bones in the pelvic/sacral/lower spine area.  If so, what did you do to help the problem?

I had radiation 10 months ago and have suffered a lot of pain in my lower right spine/sacral area.  I was told as a teenager that I have slight scoliosis, so I thought it might be arthritis related to having a somewhat crooked spine there.  It could be, but it's just been in the past couple of days that I've been thinking maybe it's related to the radiation because it's been sooo much worse since then.  I had a bone scan last spring to check for bone mets & that was all clear, thank goodness.  It did, however, show "possible degenerative bone disease".  I thought this meant arthritis, but I've read some articles online recently that talk about degenerative bone disease sometimes being caused by radiation.  I guess the radiation also can cause brittle bones and/or osteopenia or osteoparosis, and even bone fractures.  

I actually got an x-ray taken today & should have results in a couple of days. I guess it should be able to tell if there are any fractures or pits, maybe if it's arthritis- we'll see.  I wanted to get a bone density test that tests for osteoparosis, but I was told that can't be done while I'm on chemo (I'm not sure why). 

Any insight or help on this subject would be appreciated.

Thanks,  Lisa

RE: radiation damage to bones

by jcr65566 on Wed Feb 04, 2009 12:00 AM

Quote | Reply

 

On 2/4/2009 lisaann wrote:

Hi Everyone,

I posted this same message under "rectal cancer" also (which is what I actually have).  I'm wondering if any of you who have had radiation on your colon/rectal tumor have suffered any pain or problems with your bones in the pelvic/sacral/lower spine area.  If so, what did you do to help the problem?

I had radiation 10 months ago and have suffered a lot of pain in my lower right spine/sacral area.  I was told as a teenager that I have slight scoliosis, so I thought it might be arthritis related to having a somewhat crooked spine there.  It could be, but it's just been in the past couple of days that I've been thinking maybe it's related to the radiation because it's been sooo much worse since then.  I had a bone scan last spring to check for bone mets & that was all clear, thank goodness.  It did, however, show "possible degenerative bone disease".  I thought this meant arthritis, but I've read some articles online recently that talk about degenerative bone disease sometimes being caused by radiation.  I guess the radiation also can cause brittle bones and/or osteopenia or osteoparosis, and even bone fractures.  

I actually got an x-ray taken today & should have results in a couple of days. I guess it should be able to tell if there are any fractures or pits, maybe if it's arthritis- we'll see.  I wanted to get a bone density test that tests for osteoparosis, but I was told that can't be done while I'm on chemo (I'm not sure why). 

Any insight or help on this subject would be appreciated.

Thanks,  Lisa


 

H Lisa I did a lot of research on side efects of cancer to the bone . I found out bone a living thing. if it gets cancer in it the treatment will kill the cancer, but it will also kill the bone hit it with radiation and it also dies this dead bone has nice little holes that nerves and veins slide through these holes are smooth by a lining of cartilage this is also alive. When it dies with the treatment it get ruff and the nerves and veins can’t slide as well, as they did before, and they can get damage and inflamed now if they  dont get to inflamed the holes in the bone  will heal in time. Vitamin D3, fish oil, and calcium tablets can help but ask your doctor cheers Ray

RE: radiation damage to bones

by trehouse60 on Wed Feb 04, 2009 12:00 AM

Quote | Reply

There is a lot nutritionally that you can do to help your bones regenerate. Building up your supply of red blood cells and your immune system will help, too.  In addition to calcium and vitamin D, you also need a lot of vitamin C and the B complex vitamins for bone-building.

I have a series of articles about the B vitamins in my blog: "Buzzing the B's"  They describe the actions of the vitamins in laymen's terms, plus provide lists of food and herb and other natural sources, and some guidelines for how much you need.  I also have an article about vitamin C.  Here is the link for the first post - you can use the search box on the blog to find the rest:

http://motherearthtreasurechest.blogspot.com/2008/09/buzz-on

Most multiple vitamins do not contain anywhere near enough of what people need to recover from treatment of cancer.  Food is the best place to get the nutrients we need, but a good supplement for most of the B vitamins can be found in preparations for fibromyalgia or arthritis.  e.g. Fibroesssentials from Swanson vitamins - take a look at the product label

http://www.swansonvitamins.com/SWC036/ItemDetail?n=429496718

Also, high antioxidant SOD supplements (superoxide dismutase) can  help clean up both the by-products of both bone building and bone breakdown from radiation therapy.

Roasted pumpkin seeds can also provide the essential fatty acids needed for bone and nerve health, plus valuable plant protein to fuel increased metabolic needs.  I have information on my blog about pumpkin seeds as well.

Sincerely,

Tre

RE: radiation damage to bones

by lisaann on Wed Feb 04, 2009 12:00 AM

Quote | Reply

Hi,

Thank you so much, both of you, for your information.  Tre, I wil definitely be checking out your internet links.  Since I'm on chemo right now again, I don't think I'll take too much vitamin C, since I've read articles on how it can interfere with the effectiveness of the chemo.  I love orange juice & have it a few times a week anyhow, so I guess I am getting some- don't want to give that up either, as pulpy fresh orange juice is something I often crave lately.  I do take a "vitamineral green" powder a few times a week, also, which has lots of organic greens (I call it my "green sludge drink"- it grosses my kids out!)  I also enjoy just munching on baby green spinach leaves.  I will make sure I get even more B vitamins and will add in the fish oil as well.

Thanks so much & I'll be hoping to hear from my Dr. in the next day or two about how my xrays looked in that area. 

Lisa

RE: radiation damage to bones

by bamaboy on Thu Feb 05, 2009 12:00 AM

Quote | Reply
I had 6 weeks radiation for colo rectal cancer almost 5 years ago now.   My joints are terrible.  I don't know if it made the arthritis I already had much worse or gave me new problems.   Since then I've had the tendons repaired in one ankle.   I had a total knee replacment.   Then followed that up with having 3 disks took out of my neck and replaced and fused together.   To answer your question though,  I do have a lot of lower back pain also and the degenerative disk disease.   

RE: radiation damage to bones

by lisaann on Thu Feb 05, 2009 12:00 AM

Quote | Reply

Hi,

Thanks for your reply.  I'm sorry you're going through so much, yourself.  My doctor (primary care) said I couldn't have a bone density ttest while on chemo, so I ended up having regular xrays of both my neck and lower back.  They found no evidence of fractures or any osteopenia.  My neck looked normal (even though it still hurts- I guess I just made it sore when I fell).  My lower back had a bone spur, which I was told could be from the slight scoliosis I have in that part of my spine, which could be resulting in minor osteoarthritis.  I was very glad to hear it wasn't anything more major than that.  I will still pursue having a bone density test as soon as I can, because my mom has sufferered from osteoparosis, so I know I'm susceptible to it already because of that & being small boned, in addition to what the radiation might have done.

 Thanks again for your reply,

Lisa

RE: radiation damage to bones

by robertdean on Wed Dec 15, 2010 01:02 AM

Quote | Reply

lisa: i am a high grade cancer survivor. head and neck. i am a 64 yr. old married male. yes, i believe your sacral pain is bone damage on the cellular level. radiologists and oncologists never mention risk or damage from radiation. i do not know the number of trearments colo-rectal patients receive, but, head and neck patients go weekly for 35 treatments! i am not a doctor, just someone who cares about other human beings.

RE: radiation damage to bones

by sillyshe on Mon Jan 31, 2011 01:22 AM

Quote | Reply

Hello Lisa. ihave had 25 radiations 14 chemo treatments the first five chemo treatments was oxciliplatin and the the last nine were FOL-FOX i finished my last treament on April 26th 2010 im like you i was told i had a very mild case of scoliosis when i was a child ,so i figured the pain i was havin in my spine was from that i started hurtin in my spine around the end of Sept. but i thought it was just over worked th en as time went on it began to hurt worse i saw my oncologist on Jan. 26th and i told him he ran some extra blood work and i am goin Feb. 1st for a bone scan i have read alot on the message boar4d on h3ere and i also thought it was from radiation until i found this web site now i believe its from the oxciliplatin because i have alot of the symptoms as others have wrote about onm here i feel like my head is too heavy for my neck and i work a full time job when i get off work and drive home its hard for me to walk whenm i get ou5t of my carfrom all the pain in my spine and my joints in my legs hurt so bad.  im takin neurontin 1200 mg th ree time a day and hydrocodone for pain it the meds do not take the pain away but it does take th e edge off guess we will wait and see what the doc says after i get the results of the bone scan.

8 Posts | Page(s): 1 
Subscribe to this message board discussion

Latest Messages

View More

CancerCompass Survey

If you were considering traveling for cancer treatment, which headline would you find more interesting?

Get $75 for taking a research survey

We care about your feedback. Let us know how we can improve your CancerCompass experience.