MRI results nausea/vomiting

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MRI results nausea/vomiting

by velvetmoon on Fri Jun 19, 2009 12:00 AM

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Hi I just have few questions. I had a baby girl in Aug 2008 and had what I thought was really bad morning sickness for the whole 9 months but unfortuantly I the nausea/vomiting/dry heaving never subsided. I get sick one-four times a day and have had very few days of relief in between. I have been to numerous doctors with extensive GI workup including negative CT scans of ABD/Pelvis, neg abd u/s, neg hydascan of gallbladder and numerous blood work with GERD, celiac disease etc all ruled out. And a  negative upper endoscopy. I had an abnormal MRI of the brain showing a 2mm brain lesion in the left thalamus..unspecified with a slight increase of CSF behind my left eye are according the neurologist. The neuro doctor said it was a tiny spot and probably nothing to worry about and to repeat the MRI in 6 months. I am due to have it this month. I am wondering if my symptoms could be this bad and prominent with such a small tumor and if anyone else had a similar situation that turned out to be brain cancer?  The fact that almost everything else has been ruled out and the abnormal MRI brain is my only abnormality. The GI doctor I saw this week ..is very concerned and said that whenever he has a patient with unexplained nausea,vomiting and dryheaving with an abnormal MRI of the brain no matter how small ..he takes it very seriously and he said I should too and have the MRI repeated ASAP!! Should I be worried..please any help would be greatly appreciated.

RE: MRI results nausea/vomiting

by heart_and_soul on Fri Jun 19, 2009 12:00 AM

Quote | Reply

I can imagine how worried I would be if I were you. I would want the MRI as soon as possible. Depending on where a tumor is in the brain, I am afraid that yes even a small one could cause a lot of problems. I would want to know what it is and start taking care of it. You have a beloved baby and you want to be there for her for a long long time!

Wishing you all the best ~
Sarah

mom of Andy 26, dx GBM/PNET 1/09

RE: MRI results nausea/vomiting

by faith11 on Fri Jun 19, 2009 12:00 AM

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On 6/19/2009 velvetmoon wrote:

Hi I just have few questions. I had a baby girl in Aug 2008 and had what I thought was really bad morning sickness for the whole 9 months but unfortuantly I the nausea/vomiting/dry heaving never subsided. I get sick one-four times a day and have had very few days of relief in between. I have been to numerous doctors with extensive GI workup including negative CT scans of ABD/Pelvis, neg abd u/s, neg hydascan of gallbladder and numerous blood work with GERD, celiac disease etc all ruled out. And a  negative upper endoscopy. I had an abnormal MRI of the brain showing a 2mm brain lesion in the left thalamus..unspecified with a slight increase of CSF behind my left eye are according the neurologist. The neuro doctor said it was a tiny spot and probably nothing to worry about and to repeat the MRI in 6 months. I am due to have it this month. I am wondering if my symptoms could be this bad and prominent with such a small tumor and if anyone else had a similar situation that turned out to be brain cancer?  The fact that almost everything else has been ruled out and the abnormal MRI brain is my only abnormality. The GI doctor I saw this week ..is very concerned and said that whenever he has a patient with unexplained nausea,vomiting and dryheaving with an abnormal MRI of the brain no matter how small ..he takes it very seriously and he said I should too and have the MRI repeated ASAP!! Should I be worried..please any help would be greatly appreciated.

Please look into this more.  My mother's symptoms before we knew it was a brain tumor was nausea as well.  Get a second opinion or something, you need to get started on this quickly.

RE: MRI results nausea/vomiting

by terimarie on Fri Jun 19, 2009 12:00 AM

Quote | Reply
I would immediately get into a facility that will do a thorough work up.  Brain cancer is nothing to mess with.  My oncologist mentioned that one of her patients had tumor grow 3 times it's size in less then two weeks without treatment.  This isn't to scare you but to emphasize that brain tumors/lesions are very difficult to deal with and need urgent and immediate attention.  I would NOT wait at ALL.  Rush to get diagnosis.  Teri

RE: MRI results nausea/vomiting

by predisposed on Fri Jun 19, 2009 12:00 AM

Quote | Reply
Untreated glioblastoma is generally fatal in 3 to 6 months.  If you've had nausea and vomitting for 18 mo, it seems very unlikely that you have GBM causing the nausea and vomitting.  Have the symptoms gotten worse, or do you have any new symptoms?  If not, it seems unlikely that you have any kind enlarging tumor in the brain.  The tumors cause nausea and vomitting by increasing pressure in the brain, and a 2 mm lesion shouldn't have been big enough to cause increased pressure.

RE: MRI results nausea/vomiting

by predisposed on Fri Jun 19, 2009 12:00 AM

Quote | Reply

Info on chronic nausea and vomittting. 

Functional Nausea and Vomitting

BACKGROUND

There is a group of patients who have unexplained chronic nausea and/or vomiting. In the past these patients were

labelled as having psychogenic vomiting. However, there is little evidence that such a condition exists. Rather, these

patients usually have a functional gastrointestinal disorder (functional nausea and vomiting).

OBJECTIVE

This article describes the three important syndromes in adults that clinicians need to recognise: cyclic vomiting

syndrome, functional vomiting, and chronic idiopathic nausea.

DISCUSSION

Cyclic vomiting syndrome presents with stereotypical episodes of acute nausea and vomiting that may be severe.

Patients are generally well between attacks. Cannabis use can cause a similar syndrome. Patients may respond to

antimigraine therapy or low dose tricyclic antidepressant treatment. Functional vomiting is rare and presents with more

frequent vomiting episodes. Rumination needs to be distinguished from functional vomiting by careful history taking.

Tricyclic antidepressants are also useful in functional vomiting whether or not there is associated depression. Chronic

idiopathic nausea refers to patients with bothersome nausea occurring several times a week usually not associated with

vomiting. Its treatment is poorly defined but a trial of antidepressant therapy anecdotally can be helpful.

Nausea and vomiting are relatively common

complaints in the community, although patients and

doctors sometimes confuse the terms (Table 1). In a

study from a representative population living around

the Mayo Clinic (USA), 3% of people reported nausea

once per week, while nearly 2% had daily nausea.

A total of 2% reported vomiting monthly or more

frequently.1 There is an important, albeit uncommon,

group of patients who despite an intensive diagnostic

evaluation have no clear cause found for their chronic

nausea and/or vomiting. These patients are currently

classified as having functional nausea and vomiting.2,3

Table 1). In a

study from a representative population living around

the Mayo Clinic (USA), 3% of people reported nausea

once per week, while nearly 2% had daily nausea.

A total of 2% reported vomiting monthly or more

frequently.1 There is an important, albeit uncommon,

group of patients who despite an intensive diagnostic

evaluation have no clear cause found for their chronic

nausea and/or vomiting. These patients are currently

classified as having functional nausea and vomiting.2,3

1 There is an important, albeit uncommon,

group of patients who despite an intensive diagnostic

evaluation have no clear cause found for their chronic

nausea and/or vomiting. These patients are currently

classified as having functional nausea and vomiting.2,3

2,3

Psychogenic vomiting

In the past, all chronic unexplained vomiting was typically

labelled as ‘psychogenic’. Classic papers were published

on the topic, notably one in the 1930s4 and another in

the 1960s.5 These authors assumed their patients had a

psychogenic cause because nothing else was found, but

no attempt was made to assign a modern psychiatric label

or compare their patients with controls.

More recently, a Japanese study reported data from

59 patients with presumed psychogenic vomiting, and

for the first time systematically evaluated personality and

psychiatric status.6 In this case series, all the patients were

given a psychiatric diagnostic label and most (53%) had

‘conversion disorder’, while others (36%) were suffering

from depression. However, there was no control group,

and referral bias might explain the high rate of psychiatric

labelling. A study from the Mayo Clinic subsequently did

include appropriate controls,7 and found that psychiatric

diagnoses were similarly distributed in patients with

chronic unexplained vomiting and organic disease controls.

Unexplained chronic gastrointestinal symptoms and

psychiatric disease are both common, and even if they

overlap, does not indicate a cause and effect relationship.

Indeed, there is no convincing literature that supports the

existence of a pure psychogenic aetiology for unexplained

vomiting. This is not to say that it can’t happen. Panic

disorder, for example, can present with vomiting as one of

its features, although this is probably uncommon.7 Based

on the available evidence (which for vomiting is limited),

4 and another in

the 1960s.5 These authors assumed their patients had a

psychogenic cause because nothing else was found, but

no attempt was made to assign a modern psychiatric label

or compare their patients with controls.

More recently, a Japanese study reported data from

59 patients with presumed psychogenic vomiting, and

for the first time systematically evaluated personality and

psychiatric status.6 In this case series, all the patients were

given a psychiatric diagnostic label and most (53%) had

‘conversion disorder’, while others (36%) were suffering

from depression. However, there was no control group,

and referral bias might explain the high rate of psychiatric

labelling. A study from the Mayo Clinic subsequently did

include appropriate controls,7 and found that psychiatric

diagnoses were similarly distributed in patients with

chronic unexplained vomiting and organic disease controls.

Unexplained chronic gastrointestinal symptoms and

psychiatric disease are both common, and even if they

overlap, does not indicate a cause and effect relationship.

Indeed, there is no convincing literature that supports the

existence of a pure psychogenic aetiology for unexplained

vomiting. This is not to say that it can’t happen. Panic

disorder, for example, can present with vomiting as one of

its features, although this is probably uncommon.7 Based

on the available evidence (which for vomiting is limited),

5 These authors assumed their patients had a

psychogenic cause because nothing else was found, but

no attempt was made to assign a modern psychiatric label

or compare their patients with controls.

More recently, a Japanese study reported data from

59 patients with presumed psychogenic vomiting, and

for the first time systematically evaluated personality and

psychiatric status.6 In this case series, all the patients were

given a psychiatric diagnostic label and most (53%) had

‘conversion disorder’, while others (36%) were suffering

from depression. However, there was no control group,

and referral bias might explain the high rate of psychiatric

labelling. A study from the Mayo Clinic subsequently did

include appropriate controls,7 and found that psychiatric

diagnoses were similarly distributed in patients with

chronic unexplained vomiting and organic disease controls.

Unexplained chronic gastrointestinal symptoms and

psychiatric disease are both common, and even if they

overlap, does not indicate a cause and effect relationship.

Indeed, there is no convincing literature that supports the

existence of a pure psychogenic aetiology for unexplained

vomiting. This is not to say that it can’t happen. Panic

disorder, for example, can present with vomiting as one of

its features, although this is probably uncommon.7 Based

on the available evidence (which for vomiting is limited),

6 In this case series, all the patients were

given a psychiatric diagnostic label and most (53%) had

‘conversion disorder’, while others (36%) were suffering

from depression. However, there was no control group,

and referral bias might explain the high rate of psychiatric

labelling. A study from the Mayo Clinic subsequently did

include appropriate controls,7 and found that psychiatric

diagnoses were similarly distributed in patients with

chronic unexplained vomiting and organic disease controls.

Unexplained chronic gastrointestinal symptoms and

psychiatric disease are both common, and even if they

overlap, does not indicate a cause and effect relationship.

Indeed, there is no convincing literature that supports the

existence of a pure psychogenic aetiology for unexplained

vomiting. This is not to say that it can’t happen. Panic

disorder, for example, can present with vomiting as one of

its features, although this is probably uncommon.7 Based

on the available evidence (which for vomiting is limited),

7 and found that psychiatric

diagnoses were similarly distributed in patients with

chronic unexplained vomiting and organic disease controls.

Unexplained chronic gastrointestinal symptoms and

psychiatric disease are both common, and even if they

overlap, does not indicate a cause and effect relationship.

Indeed, there is no convincing literature that supports the

existence of a pure psychogenic aetiology for unexplained

vomiting. This is not to say that it can’t happen. Panic

disorder, for example, can present with vomiting as one of

its features, although this is probably uncommon.7 Based

on the available evidence (which for vomiting is limited),

7 Based

on the available evidence (which for vomiting is limited),

Nicholas J Talley

MD, PhD, FRACP, FRCP, is

Professor of Medicine, Mayo

Clinic, Rochester, United

States. talley.nicholas@

mayo.edu

Functional nausea

and vomiting

Reprinted from Australian Family Physician Vol. 36, No. 9, September 2007 695

Vol. 36, No. 9, September 2007 695

consensus opinion has therefore favoured dropping the

term psychogenic altogether.3

3

Functional nausea and vomiting

There are three specific syndromes to recognise in

practice: cyclic vomiting syndrome (CVS), functional

vomiting (FV), and chronic idiopathic nausea (CIN)

(Table 2). Before labelling a patient with a functional

disorder, structural and biochemical causes must be ruled

out with appropriate investigations.

Table 2). Before labelling a patient with a functional

disorder, structural and biochemical causes must be ruled

out with appropriate investigations.

Cyclic vomiting syndrome in adults

Cyclic vomiting is a rare condition. It was first recognised

in the paediatric population but is now known to occur in

adults.8 Adults typically develop CVS in middle age (around

35 years), although it can occur at any age.9,10

8 Adults typically develop CVS in middle age (around

35 years), although it can occur at any age.9,10

9,10

Diagnosis

Patients typically present with acute episodes of nausea

and vomiting without warning. Symptoms finally settle

completely but recur weeks to months later.9,10 Between

episodes patients are asymptomatic. Episodes are

stereotypical, ie. predictable in terms of symptom pattern,

onset and duration. Typically adults have about four discreet

episodes of nausea and vomiting per year with each

episode or cycle lasting about 6 days (range 1–21 days).

The patient is then symptom free often for months before

the exact same type of episode recurs. Typically diagnosis

is delayed for several years.

9,10 Between

episodes patients are asymptomatic. Episodes are

stereotypical, ie. predictable in terms of symptom pattern,

onset and duration. Typically adults have about four discreet

episodes of nausea and vomiting per year with each

episode or cycle lasting about 6 days (range 1–21 days).

The patient is then symptom free often for months before

the exact same type of episode recurs. Typically diagnosis

is delayed for several years.

Associated conditions

Up to one in 4 adults with CVS also has a history (or

family history) of migraine headache.9,11 It is important

to ask about cannabis use. Patients may use cannabis

to relieve nausea and vomiting. Cannabis use can also

precipitate CVS in some cases and ceasing cannabis can

lead to complete relief.12 Many patients have compulsive

bathing behaviours (multiple hot showers or baths often

waking up during the night to do so). A urine drug screen

can be helpful is you are suspicious and the patient

denies cannabis use. Some patients have menstrual

related cyclic vomiting.

9,11 It is important

to ask about cannabis use. Patients may use cannabis

to relieve nausea and vomiting. Cannabis use can also

precipitate CVS in some cases and ceasing cannabis can

lead to complete relief.12 Many patients have compulsive

bathing behaviours (multiple hot showers or baths often

waking up during the night to do so). A urine drug screen

can be helpful is you are suspicious and the patient

denies cannabis use. Some patients have menstrual

related cyclic vomiting.

12 Many patients have compulsive

bathing behaviours (multiple hot showers or baths often

waking up during the night to do so). A urine drug screen

can be helpful is you are suspicious and the patient

denies cannabis use. Some patients have menstrual

related cyclic vomiting.

Investigations

Before making a firm diagnosis of CVS it is important to

rule out motility disorders of the upper gastrointestinal

tract as well as metabolic and central nervous system

diseases.2,3 Most authorities suggest upper endoscopy and

small bowel X-ray or computed tomography enterography.

Biochemical testing for electrolyte abnormalities, serum

calcium, thyroid function tests and, if indicated, tests

to exclude hypoadrenalism (Addison disease) are also

relevant. Gastric emptying testing may be considered

where available. In CVS, recent data suggests that gastric

emptying is accelerated rather than delayed in a subset

of patients.11 There are mitochondrial diseases that can

be associated with intermittent vomiting such as medium

chain acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency.13 This

2,3 Most authorities suggest upper endoscopy and

small bowel X-ray or computed tomography enterography.

Biochemical testing for electrolyte abnormalities, serum

calcium, thyroid function tests and, if indicated, tests

to exclude hypoadrenalism (Addison disease) are also

relevant. Gastric emptying testing may be considered

where available. In CVS, recent data suggests that gastric

emptying is accelerated rather than delayed in a subset

of patients.11 There are mitochondrial diseases that can

be associated with intermittent vomiting such as medium

chain acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency.13 This

11 There are mitochondrial diseases that can

be associated with intermittent vomiting such as medium

chain acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency.13 This

13 This

Table 2. Rome III classification of functional nausea and vomiting

Diagnostic criteria* for nausea and vomiting disorders

Chronic idiopathic nausea

Must include all of the following:

– bothersome nausea occurring at least several times per week

– not usually associated with vomiting

– absence of abnormalities at upper endoscopy or metabolic disease that

explains the nausea

* criteria fulfilled for past 3 months with symptom onset at least 6 months before

diagnosis

Functional vomiting

Must include all of the following:

– on average one or more episodes of vomiting per week

– absence of criteria for an eating disorder, rumination, or major psychiatric

disease according to DSM-IV

– absence of self induced vomiting and chronic cannabinoid use and

absence of abnormalities in the central nervous system or metabolic

diseases to explain recurrent vomiting

* criteria fulfilled for the past 3 months with symptom onset at least 6 months

before diagnosis

Cyclic vomiting syndrome

Must include all of the following:

– stereotypical episodes of vomiting regarding onset (acute) and duration

(<1 week)

– three or more discrete episodes in the previous year

– absence of nausea and vomiting between episodes

Supportive criterion:

• history or family history of migraine headaches

Source: Drossman DA, Corazziari E, Delvaux M, et al. Rome III: the functional

gastrointestinal disorders. 3rd edn. McLean, Virginia: Degnon Associates, 2006

Table 1. Definitions of key terms

Nausea – a painless, unpleasant, subjective feeling of wanting to vomit

Vomiting – the forceful expulsion of gastric or intestinal contents

Retching – abdominal muscle contractions with laboured rhythmic respiration

Rumination – the effortless regurgitation of recently ingested food typically

in the absence of nausea. Often the food tastes good and is re-swallowed.

Rumination should be distinguished from vomiting even though patients will

often refer to their problem as vomiting when they present with this condition

THEME Functional nausea and vomiting

Functional nausea and vomiting

696 Reprinted from Australian Family Physician Vol. 36, No. 9, September 2007

Reprinted from Australian Family Physician
Vol. 36, No. 9, September 2007

is most often seen in children, but if there is any concern

testing should be considered.

Treatment

Acute care

During an acute episode, patients with CVS may require

hospital admission for intravenous fluids and intravenous

antiemetic therapy. Another approach is to prescribe

antimigraine therapy at the onset of an attack, particularly

if there is a personal or family history of migraine. A triptan

such as sumatriptan (a 5HT1 agonist) can be effective for

acute migraine and for CVS. Triptans can be given as a

subcutaneous injection or nasal spray, or orally in the early

stages of an episode. Remember triptans have a risk of

inducing vascular problems in ischaemic heart disease,

ischaemic stroke and uncontrolled hypertension.

Prevention

For the prevention of attacks of cyclic vomiting, one of the

most effective therapies appears to be low dose tricyclic

antidepressant treatment.9,11 This is based on anecdotal

data as there are no clinical trials. However, use of drugs

such as desipramine, nortriptyline or doxepin in a median

dose of about 50 mg/day does seem to be helpful in

practice and should be considered unless there is an active

contraindication. In one uncontrolled study, 24 patients

received amitriptyline up to 1 mg/kg/day for at least 3

months; 93% had a reduction in symptoms and 26% went

into remission.11 Beta blockers (eg. propranolol) may also

help prevent episodes.

In a uncontrolled study, newer antiepileptic drugs,

specifically zonisamide and levetiracetam, appeared

beneficial as maintenance medications for almost threefourths

of patients evaluated.14 Other drugs have been

tried (eg. ketorolac, prochlorperazine) but all therapies are

based on anecdotal evidence only.

In patients with menstrual related cyclic vomiting, the oral

contraceptive pill can be helpful for prevention of episodes.

Psychiatric disease appears to be uncommon in

patients with CVS.9 If depression is present it should be

treated on its own merits. Providing support is important

(see Resource).

9,11 This is based on anecdotal

data as there are no clinical trials. However, use of drugs

such as desipramine, nortriptyline or doxepin in a median

dose of about 50 mg/day does seem to be helpful in

practice and should be considered unless there is an active

contraindication. In one uncontrolled study, 24 patients

received amitriptyline up to 1 mg/kg/day for at least 3

months; 93% had a reduction in symptoms and 26% went

into remission.11 Beta blockers (eg. propranolol) may also

help prevent episodes.

In a uncontrolled study, newer antiepileptic drugs,

specifically zonisamide and levetiracetam, appeared

beneficial as maintenance medications for almost threefourths

of patients evaluated.14 Other drugs have been

tried (eg. ketorolac, prochlorperazine) but all therapies are

based on anecdotal evidence only.

In patients with menstrual related cyclic vomiting, the oral

contraceptive pill can be helpful for prevention of episodes.

Psychiatric disease appears to be uncommon in

patients with CVS.9 If depression is present it should be

treated on its own merits. Providing support is important

(see Resource).

11 Beta blockers (eg. propranolol) may also

help prevent episodes.

In a uncontrolled study, newer antiepileptic drugs,

specifically zonisamide and levetiracetam, appeared

beneficial as maintenance medications for almost threefourths

of patients evaluated.14 Other drugs have been

tried (eg. ketorolac, prochlorperazine) but all therapies are

based on anecdotal evidence only.

In patients with menstrual related cyclic vomiting, the oral

contraceptive pill can be helpful for prevention of episodes.

Psychiatric disease appears to be uncommon in

patients with CVS.9 If depression is present it should be

treated on its own merits. Providing support is important

(see Resource).

14 Other drugs have been

tried (eg. ketorolac, prochlorperazine) but all therapies are

based on anecdotal evidence only.

In patients with menstrual related cyclic vomiting, the oral

contraceptive pill can be helpful for prevention of episodes.

Psychiatric disease appears to be uncommon in

patients with CVS.9 If depression is present it should be

treated on its own merits. Providing support is important

(see Resource).

9 If depression is present it should be

treated on its own merits. Providing support is important

(see Resource).

Resource).

Functional vomiting

Functional vomiting is thought to be very rare.

Diagnosis

Functional vomiting is defined as recurrent unexplained

vomiting at least once per week that is not cyclical.3,15

3,15

Careful history taking will rule out rumination syndrome

or an eating disorder. Rumination syndrome refers to

persistent or recurrent regurgitation of recently ingested

food into the mouth; it is not vomiting (Table 1).16 The

patient either spits out the food or re-chews and swallows

it. There is no preceding retching and typically no nausea.

The regurgitant material is often pleasant tasting! While

rumination was once thought to be rare in nonretarded

adults, it may not be uncommon and is probably more

frequent than FV. Rumination is a clinical diagnosis that

is important to recognise as it is easily treated (Table

2). Rumination is thought to be an acquired habit. Habit

reversal using a breathing technique to halt regurgitation

can be easily taught to patients (diaphragmatic breathing)

and can be curative.17

Table 1).16 The

patient either spits out the food or re-chews and swallows

it. There is no preceding retching and typically no nausea.

The regurgitant material is often pleasant tasting! While

rumination was once thought to be rare in nonretarded

adults, it may not be uncommon and is probably more

frequent than FV. Rumination is a clinical diagnosis that

is important to recognise as it is easily treated (Table

2). Rumination is thought to be an acquired habit. Habit

reversal using a breathing technique to halt regurgitation

can be easily taught to patients (diaphragmatic breathing)

and can be curative.17

Table

2). Rumination is thought to be an acquired habit. Habit

reversal using a breathing technique to halt regurgitation

can be easily taught to patients (diaphragmatic breathing)

and can be curative.17

). Rumination is thought to be an acquired habit. Habit

reversal using a breathing technique to halt regurgitation

can be easily taught to patients (diaphragmatic breathing)

and can be curative.17

17

Eating disorders need to be excluded.3,18 In particular,

sensitively ask the patient questions that may reveal a

distorted body image or self induced vomiting. Expert

management with the help of a psychiatrist is required for

bulimia or anorexia nervosa.

3,18 In particular,

sensitively ask the patient questions that may reveal a

distorted body image or self induced vomiting. Expert

management with the help of a psychiatrist is required for

bulimia or anorexia nervosa.

Treatment

Management of FV remains difficult.18 Maintenance of

nutritional status and psychological support are essential.

The role of psychiatric disease is unknown. Tricyclic

antidepressants may be prescribed and anecdotally

can help some patients whether or not there is

associated depression

RE: MRI results nausea/vomiting

by jackiekay on Fri Jun 19, 2009 12:00 AM

Quote | Reply

I would also want to have a more definitive answer about what is causing this horrible problem for you.  2 mm is very small--probably too small to tell what it is for sure.  As somebody else said, cancer tends to grow very quickly so I would not panic about that although I would want to keep a close eye on that lesion. Somebody I work with just went through a similar problem except hers was more severe headaches that caused nausea. She was very worried after seeing her doctor for the MRI report & being told there was a small lesion on her thalmus.  It ended up she was diagnosed with migraines. Her headaches were quickly resolved with the correct medication. My husband developed migraines after all the crapola he has been through.  It seems I have read that there is a type of migraine that results is gastric problems rather than headaches.  I can't remember where I read it, but I would google "different types of migraines" or "gastric migraines."  Keep trying different combos until you get a hit. I hope you get this resolved quickly so you can enjoy your new family member without this dark cloud over you.

Jackiekay

RE: MRI results nausea/vomiting

by Marlee49 on Sun Jun 28, 2009 12:00 AM

Quote | Reply
Hi - My 29 year old son was diagnosed with cyclical vomiting syndrome. His brother has Lebers hereditary optic neuropathy. It causes blindness and is a mitocondrial illness. He had 2 lesions on his brain. I would have your doctor check into any mitocondrial illnesses.  Good luck - ,Marlee
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