SURVIVORS LIVER RESECTION Please !!!

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SURVIVORS LIVER RESECTION Please !!!

by 4HARTMUT on Thu Oct 08, 2009 12:00 AM

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My husband was diagnosed with satge 4 colon cancer 18 months ago - had 7 metastases to his liver. Surgeon #1 said not to bother coming back and to live thenext couple of months to the full. He did however go onto chemp - to no avail at all except terrible side effects - until Avastin. Within 8 weeks they had shrunk to invisibilty. He was monitored for 10 months - and then they came back. We went to another surgeon who said he would operate immediately and remove wedges. He removed 80% of his liver. He haemoraged badly after the op and ended up having another operation to stop the bleeding - plus another to remove the "packing" from the 2nd op. All within 4 days. He initially did very well from the liver resectionbut the other 2 ops really threw him. We are extremely grateful to the surgeon for giving us this chance but
recovery is slow. My husband has lost so much weight that it
frightens me. He is very unhappy in the hospital he is in but I have managed to have him transferred from tomorrow to another hospital (with nice food!) He is emotionaly very fragile
and I don't think he is physically able to come home right now - and he doesn't feel he is either.

However - when I look up the internet, I find that whilst liver resection may be the "gold standard" for a cure for liver metastases, it seems that most people even after all the suffering etc dont live more than 2 years.

I am desperate to know what the facts really are - is a cure ever possible?? Is 2 years really all he can hope for???
Please help!!

RE: SURVIVORS LIVER RESECTION please !!!

by barbrob on Thu Oct 08, 2009 12:00 AM

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 HI

 Sorry to hear what you and husband are going through, There are many many stories of people surviving a long time with colon cancer and liver resection. If your husband can  build up his immune system and  be positive in the journey he can be around for quite awhile, If he can keep on a good diet also.

 Then if he a good family  and friends support group for him and for YOU,,,,  this will be a huge help.. also  there is Faith.. Pray Pray and then Pray again... God know every thing and also still heals today... Do not give up, No Surender to this awful diseas..

I know what you are going through as I have travelled the road for last 8 years... keep going God Bless You Both..  and also always be Proactive in all you do ...

 Best Wishes  ROB

RE: SURVIVORS LIVER RESECTION please !!!

by 67chevelle on Thu Oct 08, 2009 12:00 AM

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I had 55% of my liver resected along with a large section of colon. It has been about a year and 10 moinths. My surgeon told me that if a spot comes back on the liver they can burn it without major surgery. He made it sound like a simple surgery. He also said many of the srudies out there are older and not to believe everything I read. In other words when I asked him the same question, he told me I have a long life to live.

I hope this helps with your concerns.

 God Bless you and your family.

RE: SURVIVORS LIVER RESECTION please !!!

by Bonzonie on Thu Oct 08, 2009 12:00 AM

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Hi -- Sorry to hear but I understand your concerns.  My husband has had two liver resections.  The first also included RFA to one of the two mets.  The second resection turned out to be only a small amount of resdiual cancer but a lot of inflammation caused by the RFA that caused the liver to adhere to the diaphragm so that had to be repaired as well.  Chest tube and the whole nine yards.  However he is doing well now and actually went windsurfing today for the first time since diagnosis.  Diagnosed 5/08

My suggestion is to try everything you can to build him up, physically and emotionally.  Try the food, especially protien, is medicine approach. I have been known to cook in the middle of the night when he mentioned feeling hungry. Gradual increase in physical activity, whether just walking, or some light weights. Encorage him to espress his feelings and read or watch upbeat things. All this did wonders for my guy.

We are all hoping for a cure but know anything close to a cure is a miracle.

I hoep your husband starts turning the corner soon.

Bonnie

RE: SURVIVORS LIVER RESECTION Please !!!

by Mousey on Fri Oct 09, 2009 12:00 AM

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Dear 4hartmut,

Each cancer case is individual, so statistics cannot promise you anything, but they should not take away your hope either.

In any case, the statistics about survival after liver resection in metastatic colorectal cancers are no longer that grim! The advances in surgery techniques and chemotherapies and antibody treatments (such as Avastin) have changed the survival statistics from what they were in the nineties. Here's some news from May (the same piece of news from two sources):

---------------------

http://coloncancer.about.com/b/2009/06/25/metastatic-colon-c

A recently published review of survival rates after metastatic colon cancer diagnosis brings new hope that this disease can be more effectively managed with newer treatment options. The results of this review, published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology online May 26, 2009, indicate that in the period from 1990 through 2006, the length of survival after metastatic colon cancer diagnosis has improved dramatically.

Between 1990 and 1997, the researchers noted that the median, overall length of survival held steady at 14.2 months.

In the following years, median survival improved notably - to 18 months from 1998 to 2000, to 18.6 months from 2001 to 2003.

The overall median length of survival improved most dramatically, to 29.2 months, for patients diagnosed with metastatic colon cancer from 2004 to 2006.

The 5-year survival rate more than doubled from 9.1% in the early years of the study to 19.2% for patients diagnosed in 2001 to 2003.

The improvements in survival are due to a combination of more effective chemotherapy medications and surgery to remove colon tumors that have spread to the liver.

--------

http://jco.ascopubs.org/cgi/content/abstract/JCO.2008.20.527 " target="_blank" rel="nofollow">http://jco.ascopubs.org/cgi/content/abstract/JCO.2008.20.527

Results: Two thousand four hundred seventy patients with metastatic CRC at diagnosis received their primary treatment at the two institutions during this time period.

Median overall survival for those patients diagnosed from 1990 to 1997 was 14.2 months, which increased to 18.0, 18.6, and 29.3 months for patients diagnosed in 1998 to 2000, 2001 to 2003, and 2004 to 2006, respectively.

Likewise, 5-year overall survival increased from 9.1% in the earliest time period to 19.2% in 2001 to 2003.

Improved outcomes from 1998 to 2004 were a result of an increase in hepatic resection, which was performed in 20% of the patients.

Improvements from 2004 to 2006 were temporally associated with increased utilization of new chemotherapeutics.

Conclusion: Profound improvements in outcome in metastatic CRC seem to be associated with the sequential increase in the use of hepatic resection in selected patients (1998 to 2006) and advancements in medical therapy (2004 to 2006).

A recently published review of survival rates after metastatic colon cancer diagnosis brings new hope that this disease can be more effectively managed with newer treatment options. The results of this review, published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology online May 26, 2009, indicate that in the period from 1990 through 2006, the length of survival after metastatic colon cancer diagnosis has improved dramatically.

Between 1990 and 1997, the researchers noted that the median, overall length of survival held steady at 14.2 months.

In the following years, median survival improved notably - to 18 months from 1998 to 2000, to 18.6 months from 2001 to 2003.

The overall median length of survival improved most dramatically, to 29.2 months, for patients diagnosed with metastatic colon cancer from 2004 to 2006.

The 5-year survival rate more than doubled from 9.1% in the early years of the study to 19.2% for patients diagnosed in 2001 to 2003.

The improvements in survival are due to a combination of more effective chemotherapy medications and surgery to remove colon tumors that have spread to the liver.

--------

http://jco.ascopubs.org/cgi/content/abstract/JCO.2008.20.527 " target="_blank" rel="nofollow">http://jco.ascopubs.org/cgi/content/abstract/JCO.2008.20.527

Results: Two thousand four hundred seventy patients with metastatic CRC at diagnosis received their primary treatment at the two institutions during this time period.

Median overall survival for those patients diagnosed from 1990 to 1997 was 14.2 months, which increased to 18.0, 18.6, and 29.3 months for patients diagnosed in 1998 to 2000, 2001 to 2003, and 2004 to 2006, respectively.

Likewise, 5-year overall survival increased from 9.1% in the earliest time period to 19.2% in 2001 to 2003.

Improved outcomes from 1998 to 2004 were a result of an increase in hepatic resection, which was performed in 20% of the patients.

Improvements from 2004 to 2006 were temporally associated with increased utilization of new chemotherapeutics.

Conclusion: Profound improvements in outcome in metastatic CRC seem to be associated with the sequential increase in the use of hepatic resection in selected patients (1998 to 2006) and advancements in medical therapy (2004 to 2006).

Results: Two thousand four hundred seventy patients with metastatic CRC at diagnosis received their primary treatment at the two institutions during this time period.

Median overall survival for those patients diagnosed from 1990 to 1997 was 14.2 months, which increased to 18.0, 18.6, and 29.3 months for patients diagnosed in 1998 to 2000, 2001 to 2003, and 2004 to 2006, respectively.

Likewise, 5-year overall survival increased from 9.1% in the earliest time period to 19.2% in 2001 to 2003.

Improved outcomes from 1998 to 2004 were a result of an increase in hepatic resection, which was performed in 20% of the patients.

Improvements from 2004 to 2006 were temporally associated with increased utilization of new chemotherapeutics.

Conclusion: Profound improvements in outcome in metastatic CRC seem to be associated with the sequential increase in the use of hepatic resection in selected patients (1998 to 2006) and advancements in medical therapy (2004 to 2006).

------------------------

Plus I have read statistics that 5 year survival  after liver resection is close to 60 percent and 10 year survival 40 per cent!

The chances of a successful surgery and cure are of course the better the fewer and smaller metastases there are, the less aggressive the cancer is, and the less complications there are during and after the surgery etc. But do not let this discourage you. Surgery *is* a possible cure. Loosing a lot of weight itself will not kill your husband. I hope he will keep on fighting no matter how miserable he may feel right now and will beat this! Do everything you can to encourage him and keep him in the fighting spirit. Statistics will not kill him either!

My husband was diagnosed with stage IV rectal (inoperable, numerous lesions in liver) 15 months ago, was originally "given" 9 months tops. He's still here, working, renovating the house, playing with our kids, living a "normal" life.

All the best and strength to both of you,

Mousey

RE: SURVIVORS LIVER RESECTION Please !!!

by Mousey on Fri Oct 09, 2009 12:00 AM

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I am really sorry about the really weird copy paste bug in the message! I have no clue how those quotes managed to get multiplied. I hope it is readable in any case.

Mousey

RE: SURVIVORS LIVER RESECTION Please !!!

by ImBrian on Fri Oct 09, 2009 12:00 AM

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Sorry to hear of your husband's tough times, but this *can* be beaten. 3 1/2 yrs ago I had 1/3 of both of my colon and liver resected -- and I'm currently cancer free. The liver will regenerate so while your hubby lost alot of it, some will come back. Hang in there -- eat *lots* of protein and try to get a bit of exercise -- it does wonders.

 You're in my thoughts and prayers,

Brian

RE: SURVIVORS LIVER RESECTION Please !!!

by 4HARTMUT on Sun Oct 11, 2009 12:00 AM

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I cannot thank you all enough for your support and the trouble you have gone to to answer me. This website is fantastic and there is so much inspiration out there. I have had him moved to another hospital and he is slowly improving. Thank you all so much. This is a terrible disease and it sure has taught us not to take each other for granted - nothing like the prospect of losing someone to make you rwalise how much you love them!

RE: SURVIVORS LIVER RESECTION Please !!!

by TOM_inTUCSON on Mon Oct 12, 2009 12:00 AM

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When I was dxed withh stage 4 crc I had 5 mets in the liver and 3 in my left lung lower lobe . That was in 1996 . I had 1 yr of chemo and the liver mets receded. In 1997 I had a 3 wedge resection in the lt lung. In 2000 and resection of a quarter of my liver. Fortunately the mets were all clustered and successfully removed. Two years ago I had the upper lobe of my rt lung resected. Two ct scans ( one a yr ago and one two months ago ) show no ca and my most recent cea was 0.3 . Everyone has a different response to treatment ; but , I believe that I am still here 13 yrs after a stage 4 dx , because of my surgeries. I had to seek out surgeons who were willing to to work with me due to my age . I was 60 when dxed and I will be 74 in April. Seeking second and third opinions is often necessary . My wife of  47 yrs is my strongest advocate . We decided early on to take no options off the table . I had an exam 2 weeks ago with a pulmonologist who said I had excellent lungs but I will have sob on exertion because I have 2 lobes gone . However , exertion  won't harm me . You have to keep going and be positive . Your brain is a powerful part of your defense . You have to use it to the full power and not give in .

 

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