RAI Treatment...what to expect, the process, advice?

3 Posts | Page(s): 1 

RAI Treatment...what to expect, the process, advice?

by rosesbud on Sun Nov 01, 2009 08:50 PM

Quote | Reply

Any insight from those who have recently gone through this treatment? Did you go home after the treatment?  How do you feel?  I have a toddler in my home and don't want to expose them to radiation.  Only upon really questioning my doctor did he indicate I should probably discourage contact with my child for awhile.  I feel like all I get from the doctor is go on the diet, don't worry, stay away from others for a few days.  That's it, really? What I have read seems to indicate there is more to it.  After a stomach surgery earlier this year, I realized the doctors are not on the receiving end of the process, so it isn't a big deal for them.  Anyway, what was the process like for you?  What do you wish someone had told you that they didn't and what would you do differently if you had to do it again?  thanks.

RE: RAI Treatment...what to expect, the process, advice?

by tink2002 on Mon Nov 02, 2009 02:12 AM

Quote | Reply

I have heard such a wide range of recommendations regarding ablation doses of RAI...I got the most information from the nuclear med doctor, but by the time I got it from him, I was having the treatment.  It seems that the guidelines vary based on low doses (100 mCi or less); medium doses (101-150 mCi); large doses (more than 150 mCi).  I am posting some of the guidelines found on the thyca website:

http://www.thyca.org/rai.htm#after

I hope this will give you a general idea but remember that every case is different, and every doctor seems to recommend their own program.  good luck to you

As your doctor will have explained to you, you will be receiving radioactive iodine as your treatment. Radioactive iodine decreases the function of thyroid cells and inhibits their ability to grow. It is given to you in liquid or pill form and goes directly to the thyroid gland where it is absorbed by the thyroid tissue. Most of the radioactive iodine will be received by your thyroid gland. Any radioactive iodine not collected by the thyroid gland will be eliminated during the first few days through urine, feces, saliva and sweat. The following steps listed below will help assure that the excreted radiation from your body does not contaminate the environment or cause harm to other people.

For information about possible side effects of radioactive iodine, see the information below in the section about the hospital stay.

What do I do at home?
If you go home immediately after a treatment dose, use the following guidelines regarding distance, time, and hygiene.

  • Minimize contact (less than 3 feet or 0.6 meter for more than 1 hour each day) with everyone for the first five days, and with small children or pregnant women for eight days.
  • Do not sit next to someone in an automobile for more than one hour.
  • Sleep in a separate room and use separate bath linen and launder these and underclothing separately for one week.
  • Wash your hands with soap and plenty of water every time you use the toilet.
  • Rinse the sink and tub thoroughly after using them.
  • Use separate eating utensils or disposable eating utensils. Wash eating utensils separately for one week. Do not prepare food for others.
  • Flush toilet 2-3 times after use for two weeks after discharge.
  • Males should sit when urinating to avoid splashing for one week.
  • Discuss with your doctor how long you should wait before starting a pregnancy after your treatment (usually at least two months for males and six months for females).
  • If you are breastfeeding, it should be discontinued, but can be resumed for subsequent childbirths.

RE: RAI Treatment...what to expect, the process, advice?

by Adrian09 on Wed Nov 04, 2009 12:37 AM

Quote | Reply

On Nov 01, 2009 8:50 PM rosesbud wrote:

Any insight from those who have recently gone through this treatment? Did you go home after the treatment?  How do you feel?  I have a toddler in my home and don't want to expose them to radiation.  Only upon really questioning my doctor did he indicate I should probably discourage contact with my child for awhile.  I feel like all I get from the doctor is go on the diet, don't worry, stay away from others for a few days.  That's it, really? What I have read seems to indicate there is more to it.  After a stomach surgery earlier this year, I realized the doctors are not on the receiving end of the process, so it isn't a big deal for them.  Anyway, what was the process like for you?  What do you wish someone had told you that they didn't and what would you do differently if you had to do it again?  thanks.

Hi Rosebud,

I had I131 dose today and I had a high dose of 150 because my pathology report indicated that was what I needed. I am at home and I was fortunate to have a doctor that told me what to expect to stay completely away from my kids and husband for a full 2 days. On the third day I can come out of my room and be at least 6 feet away from them but hubby still can't sleep in the room for 5 days. The Nuclear Med Dr was alot more thorough though. She was the one who told me to flush 2-3 time after urination, make sure to wash my hands, gloved hands if you are touching things others in your home will be touching, don't prepare others food, and so on. I must say that the first thing I was asked was if I had kids and what precautions to use. Especially little ones you should away from, I know it's hard cuz it's your baby but you want to keep your baby safe. I must say that I had alot of questions myself though like what extra precautions to take if I start my cycle during this time and what to do if I vomit because my stomach has become so sensitive to everything and this is my first time having radioactive iodine. It did taste like metal and of course I still feel like crap from having to go hypothyroid for 6 weeks but I am hoping to get back to my full self soon. I hope this helped you some.   

3 Posts | Page(s): 1 
Subscribe to this message board discussion

Latest Messages

View More

CancerCompass Survey

If you were considering traveling for cancer treatment, which headline would you find more interesting?

Get $75 for taking a research survey

We care about your feedback. Let us know how we can improve your CancerCompass experience.