When to no longer receive chemo

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When to no longer receive chemo

by smoser on Fri Dec 02, 2011 03:01 PM

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I am stage 4 breast recurrent cancer. I was on taxotere 5 rounds and received terrible sideeffects It cooked my skin, now on now on gemso  two weeks on one week off and feel better. My question

 is how dangerous is to be on chemo ? A year? What negatives are there for internal organs re; to chemo? Any response would be appreciated!

Susan

RE: When to no longer receive chemo

by bender on Fri Dec 02, 2011 06:22 PM

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I am a stage IV bc survivor that was diagnosed in 1998 and in 2000 it became stage IV after the mascetomy, radiation to the chest and 4 rounds of A/C.   Again the cancer recurred under my arm that I had had the mascetomy so I had radiation.   Two yrs later I was treated for a parasite as my immune sys was so low and then had to have a stint put in my bile duct/pancreas/gallbladder.  This started about a five year battle with different chemos =taxotere/taxol, CMF, Avastin,Gemzar, Zeloda and a couple others I can't remember.  I was on male hormones, arimedex, tamoxifen and a couple others I can't remember.  I also have skin mets so I had 5FU ointment which really did a good job.   Now I am on Magace which is progsteren.    My point is that you do what you have to do to stay alive.  Yes, there are ton of side effect that may or may not effect you.  The way I look at it is I have nothing to loose by continuing treatment as the cancer may kill me sooner than my liver fails.   Next April will be my thirteen year anniversary and I still work part-time.

rjcrossley rjcrossley
(Inactive)

RE: When to no longer receive chemo

by rjcrossley on Fri Dec 02, 2011 06:51 PM

Quote | Reply

On Dec 02, 2011 3:01 PM smoser wrote:

I am stage 4 breast recurrent cancer. I was on taxotere 5 rounds and received terrible sideeffects It cooked my skin, now on now on gemso  two weeks on one week off and feel better. My question

 is how dangerous is to be on chemo ? A year? What negatives are there for internal organs re; to chemo? Any response would be appreciated!

Susan

How chemotherapy kills cancer cells

Hi Smoser Sorry for what your going though Wow a year a long time Im on an holistic aproch my naturopath put me on in 2008 its put me in to compleat remishion but All the best and  I hope this will help

Body tissues are made of billions of individual cells. Once we are fully grown, most of the body's cells don't divide much. They spend most of their time in a resting state and only divide if they need to repair damage. When cells divide they split into two, identical new cells. So, where there was 1 cell, there are now 2 and these then divide to make 4 and then 8 and so on.

In cancer the cells keep on dividing until there is a mass of cells. This mass of cells becomes a lump. The lump is called a tumour. Cancer cells divide much more often than most normal cells.

Chemotherapy enters the bloodstream and damages dividing cells. Cells in the process of dividing are more at risk of being damaged by chemotherapy. Chemotherapy kills the cell by damaging the part of the control centre inside each cell that makes cells divide. Or it may interrupt the chemical processes involved in cell division.

The main ways you can have chemotherapy are as

  • An injection into the bloodstream
  • A drip (intravenous infusion) into the bloodstream
  • Tablets
  • Capsules

The chemotherapy drugs circulate all round the body in the bloodstream and can reach cancer cells almost anywhere in the body. This is known as systemic treatment.

There is information abouthow normal cells growand abouthow cancer cells differfrom normal cells in theabout cancer sectionof CancerHelp UK.

Back to top
How chemotherapy kills dividing cells

Chemotherapy damages cells as they divide. In the centre of each living cell is a dark blob, called the nucleus. The nucleus is the control centre of the cell. It containschromosomes, which are made up ofgenes. These genes have to be copied exactly each time a cell divides into 2 to make new cells.

Chemotherapy damages the genes inside the nucleus of cells. Some drugs damage cells at the point of splitting. Some damage the cells while they are making copies of all their genes before they split. Cells that are at rest, for instance most normal cells, are much less likely to be damaged by chemotherapy. You may have a combination of different chemotherapy drugs. The combination will include chemotherapy drugs that damage cells at different stages in the process of cell division. So, with more than one type of drug, there is more chance of killing more cells. The fact that chemotherapy drugs kill dividing cells helps to explain why chemotherapy causes side effects. It affects healthy body tissues where the cells are constantly growing and dividing. The skin, bone marrow, hair follicles and lining of the digestive system are examples of cells that are constantly growing and dividing. Your hair is always growing Your bone marrow is constantly producing blood cells The cells of your skin and the lining of your digestive system are constantly renewing themselves. Because these tissues have dividing cells they can be damaged by chemotherapy. But normal cells can replace or repair the healthy cells that are damaged by chemotherapy. So the damage to healthy cells doesn't usually last. Most side effects disappear once your treatment is over, and some only happen during the days while you are actually having the drugs, for example, sickness or diarrhoea. The section about cancer drug side effects explains this in detail. Back to top How well chemotherapy works The chance of the chemotherapy curing your cancer depends on the type of cancer you have With some types of cancer most people are cured by chemotherapy With other types of cancer fewer people are completely cured Examples of cancers where chemotherapy works very well are testicular cancer and Hodgkin's lymphoma. With some cancers, chemotherapy can't cure the cancer on its own. But it can help in combination with other types of treatment. For example, many people with breast or bowel cancer have chemotherapy after surgery to help lower the risk of the cancer coming back. With some cancers, if a cure is unlikely, your doctor may still suggest chemotherapy to Shrink the cancer Relieve your symptoms Give you a longer life by controlling the cancer or putting it into remission Back to top What remission means Remission is a word doctors often use when talking about cancer or leukaemia. It means that after treatment there is no sign of the cancer. You may hear your doctor talk about complete remission and partial remission. Complete remission means that the cancer or leukaemia can't be detected on scans, X-rays, or blood tests, etc. Doctors sometimes call this a complete response. Partial remission means the treatment has killed some of the cells, but not all. The cancer has shrunk, but can still be seen on scans and doesn't appear to be growing. The treatment may have stopped the cancer from growing. Or the treatment may have made the cancer smaller so that other treatments are more likely to help, such as surgery or radiotherapy. This is sometimes called a partial response. Another term doctors use is stable disease. This can mean that the cancer has stayed the same size or it may even have grown by a small amount.

http://cancerhelp.cancerresearchuk.org/about-cancer/treatmen

rjcrossley rjcrossley
(Inactive)

RE: When to no longer receive chemo

by rjcrossley on Fri Dec 02, 2011 06:55 PM

Quote | Reply

On Dec 02, 2011 3:01 PM smoser wrote:

I am stage 4 breast recurrent cancer. I was on taxotere 5 rounds and received terrible sideeffects It cooked my skin, now on now on gemso  two weeks on one week off and feel better. My question

 is how dangerous is to be on chemo ? A year? What negatives are there for internal organs re; to chemo? Any response would be appreciated!

Susan

How chemotherapy kills cancer cells Hi Susan Sorry for what your going though. Wow a year a long time to be n chemo. Im on an holistic aproch my naturopath put me on in 2008 its mow put me in to compleat remishion but All the best with it any way hope this will help Ray Body tissues are made of billions of individual cells. Once we are fully grown, most of the body's cells don't divide much. They spend most of their time in a resting state and only divide if they need to repair damage. When cells divide they split into two, identical new cells. So, where there was 1 cell, there are now 2 and these then divide to make 4 and then 8 and so on. In cancer the cells keep on dividing until there is a mass of cells. This mass of cells becomes a lump. The lump is called a tumour. Cancer cells divide much more often than most normal cells. Chemotherapy enters the bloodstream and damages dividing cells. Cells in the process of dividing are more at risk of being damaged by chemotherapy. Chemotherapy kills the cell by damaging the part of the control centre inside each cell that makes cells divide. Or it may interrupt the chemical processes involved in cell division. The main ways you can have chemotherapy are as •An injection into the bloodstream •A drip (intravenous infusion) into the bloodstream •Tablets •Capsules The chemotherapy drugs circulate all round the body in the bloodstream and can reach cancer cells almost anywhere in the body. This is known as systemic treatment. There is information about how normal cells grow and about how cancer cells differ from normal cells in the about cancer section of CancerHelp UK. Back to top How chemotherapy kills dividing cells Chemotherapy damages cells as they divide. In the centre of each living cell is a dark blob, called the nucleus. The nucleus is the control centre of the cell. It contains chromosomes, which are made up of genes. These genes have to be copied exactly each time a cell divides into 2 to make new cells. Chemotherapy damages the genes inside the nucleus of cells. Some drugs damage cells at the point of splitting. Some damage the cells while they are making copies of all their genes before they split. Cells that are at rest, for instance most normal cells, are much less likely to be damaged by chemotherapy. You may have a combination of different chemotherapy drugs. The combination will include chemotherapy drugs that damage cells at different stages in the process of cell division. So, with more than one type of drug, there is more chance of killing more cells. The fact that chemotherapy drugs kill dividing cells helps to explain why chemotherapy causes side effects. It affects healthy body tissues where the cells are constantly growing and dividing. The skin, bone marrow, hair follicles and lining of the digestive system are examples of cells that are constantly growing and dividing. Your hair is always growing Your bone marrow is constantly producing blood cells The cells of your skin and the lining of your digestive system are constantly renewing themselves. Because these tissues have dividing cells they can be damaged by chemotherapy. But normal cells can replace or repair the healthy cells that are damaged by chemotherapy. So the damage to healthy cells doesn't usually last. Most side effects disappear once your treatment is over, and some only happen during the days while you are actually having the drugs, for example, sickness or diarrhoea. The section about cancer drug side effects explains this in detail. Back to top How well chemotherapy works The chance of the chemotherapy curing your cancer depends on the type of cancer you have With some types of cancer most people are cured by chemotherapy With other types of cancer fewer people are completely cured Examples of cancers where chemotherapy works very well are testicular cancer and Hodgkin's lymphoma. With some cancers, chemotherapy can't cure the cancer on its own. But it can help in combination with other types of treatment. For example, many people with breast or bowel cancer have chemotherapy after surgery to help lower the risk of the cancer coming back. With some cancers, if a cure is unlikely, your doctor may still suggest chemotherapy to Shrink the cancer Relieve your symptoms Give you a longer life by controlling the cancer or putting it into remission Back to top What remission means Remission is a word doctors often use when talking about cancer or leukaemia. It means that after treatment there is no sign of the cancer. You may hear your doctor talk about complete remission and partial remission. Complete remission means that the cancer or leukaemia can't be detected on scans, X-rays, or blood tests, etc. Doctors sometimes call this a complete response. Partial remission means the treatment has killed some of the cells, but not all. The cancer has shrunk, but can still be seen on scans and doesn't appear to be growing. The treatment may have stopped the cancer from growing. Or the treatment may have made the cancer smaller so that other treatments are more likely to help, such as surgery or radiotherapy. This is sometimes called a partial response. Another term doctors use is stable disease. This can mean that the cancer has stayed the same size or it may even have grown by a small amount. http://cancerhelp.cancerresearchuk.org/about-cancer/treatmen

RE: When to no longer receive chemo

by Johnr_1 on Fri Dec 02, 2011 07:09 PM

Quote | Reply

On Dec 02, 2011 3:01 PM smoser wrote:

I am stage 4 breast recurrent cancer. I was on taxotere 5 rounds and received terrible sideeffects It cooked my skin, now on now on gemso  two weeks on one week off and feel better. My question

 is how dangerous is to be on chemo ? A year? What negatives are there for internal organs re; to chemo? Any response would be appreciated!

Susan

I am a 4 time Lung Cancer survivor. I have had over 35 chemos of Taxol, Carbo/Cisplatin, and Alimta. 2 major lung surgeries, over 40 CT and Pet Scans and over 600 needles and IV's and 28 Radiation treatments to the neck. And right now i am all clear over the 12 years i have been doing this. Naturopathic things have their place and i have used them (maybe 10 to 15% of what i do) but they are not a substitute for Surgery, Chemo and Radiation.

Here are all my personal notes:

 

http://liveforeverwithcancer.com/

 

My Best to You

Johnr_1

RE: When to no longer receive chemo

by smoser on Fri Dec 02, 2011 07:13 PM

Quote | Reply

On Dec 02, 2011 3:01 PM smoser wrote:

I am stage 4 breast recurrent cancer. I was on taxotere 5 rounds and received terrible sideeffects It cooked my skin, now on now on gemso  two weeks on one week off and feel better. My question

 is how dangerous is to be on chemo ? A year? What negatives are there for internal organs re; to chemo? Any response would be appreciated!

Susan

Thank you for your valuable information regarding to my concerns.  I learned and received insightful health information from you all.

Any other thought re; to stint in liver cancer did show as a liesion or leisionsin liver with mets to bone

RE: When to no longer receive chemo

by smoser on Fri Dec 02, 2011 07:16 PM

Quote | Reply

On Dec 02, 2011 7:09 PM Johnr_1 wrote:

On Dec 02, 2011 3:01 PM smoser wrote:

I am stage 4 breast recurrent cancer. I was on taxotere 5 rounds and received terrible sideeffects It cooked my skin, now on now on gemso  two weeks on one week off and feel better. My question

 is how dangerous is to be on chemo ? A year? What negatives are there for internal organs re; to chemo? Any response would be appreciated!

Susan

I am a 4 time Lung Cancer survivor. I have had over 35 chemos of Taxol, Carbo/Cisplatin, and Alimta. 2 major lung surgeries, over 40 CT and Pet Scans and over 600 needles and IV's and 28 Radiation treatments to the neck. And right now i am all clear over the 12 years i have been doing this. Naturopathic things have their place and i have used them (maybe 10 to 15% of what i do) but they are not a substitute for Surgery, Chemo and Radiation.

Here are all my personal notes:

 

http://liveforeverwithcancer.com/ "" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">http://liveforeverwithcancer.com/ " target="_blank" rel="nofollow">http://liveforeverwithcancer.com/

 

My Best to You

Johnr_1

Thank you John and so happy for your valient fight You are a remarkable person and appreciate your note to me!

Susan

rjcrossley rjcrossley
(Inactive)

RE: When to no longer receive chemo

by rjcrossley on Sun Dec 04, 2011 08:24 PM

Quote | Reply

On Dec 02, 2011 7:09 PM Johnr_1 wrote:

On Dec 02, 2011 3:01 PM smoser wrote:

I am stage 4 breast recurrent cancer. I was on taxotere 5 rounds and received terrible sideeffects It cooked my skin, now on now on gemso  two weeks on one week off and feel better. My question

 is how dangerous is to be on chemo ? A year? What negatives are there for internal organs re; to chemo? Any response would be appreciated!

Susan

I am a 4 time Lung Cancer survivor. I have had over 35 chemos of Taxol, Carbo/Cisplatin, and Alimta. 2 major lung surgeries, over 40 CT and Pet Scans and over 600 needles and IV's and 28 Radiation treatments to the neck. And right now i am all clear over the 12 years i have been doing this. Naturopathic things have their place and i have used them (maybe 10 to 15% of what i do) but they are not a substitute for Surgery, Chemo and Radiation.

Here are all my personal notes:

 

http://liveforeverwithcancer.com/ "" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">http://liveforeverwithcancer.com/ " target="_blank" rel="nofollow">http://liveforeverwithcancer.com/

 

My Best to You

Johnr_1

Hi john with me in 2008 the option of treatment was taken away from me. So I had no choice but the go down the naturopath road, or die a painful death. I agree with Susan your a valiant fighter and you truly are a remarkable person. I remember I once talk to a lady in the old church cancer support group who had Non-small cell lung cancer.  she told me she never smoked in her life.  but her husband and sons did.  she to had Radiation treatment.  Surgery, she said she also had Chemo. a few times   but unlike your cancer it keep coming back she fnily come to our church to make her peace with god.  But from other members She learned aboutLiquid cellular Zeolite that how it removes heavy metals and toxins . and how it may be able to help her though it notNaturopathicshe told us, later  there was an great  improvement after she went on a course of 15 drops 4 times a day so the must be some thing in this one. All the best mate

Ray    

RE: When to no longer receive chemo

by shirlbr549 on Mon Dec 12, 2011 08:49 PM

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congradulations on your 13 year out....!!!! a motivation for others

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