What about astrocytomas- please

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What about astrocytomas- please

by eternalife on Sun Oct 28, 2012 04:58 PM

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Hello,

This site is full of GBM chatter, is there anyone out there with the low grade astrocytoma? Would like to hear your story. Any long term survivors?

Thanks

RE: What about astrocytomas- please

by siblingof on Sun Oct 28, 2012 05:09 PM

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"chatter"?

RE: What about astrocytomas- please

by oakisland on Sun Oct 28, 2012 10:16 PM

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Hi,

My Roger had anaplastic astrocytoma grade 3. His story is very interesting, a lot of changes in a short period of time.

RE: What about astrocytomas- please

by eternalife on Sun Oct 28, 2012 10:28 PM

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Hi oakisland,

It would be beneficial for others to hear about astrocytoma and Roger's story , if you want to post it. There is a need for everyone to know about brain cancer at every stage..not just the prevalent GBM...

With thanks,

RE: What about astrocytomas- please

by marfunk84 on Sun Oct 28, 2012 11:18 PM

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My husband was diagnosed with AA 3 back in March of 2008. Although his diagnosis doesn't carry the severe significance of GBM, I don't feel it, by any means, indicates a "better" diagnosis-- more like a lesser-understood diagnosis. That being said, he was relatively symptom-free( not tumor-progression free) for the first 4 years or so. Last few months are the first we've experienced any significant cognitive and emotional disturbances.

RE: What about astrocytomas- please

by oakisland on Mon Oct 29, 2012 12:19 AM

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On Oct 28, 2012 10:28 PM eternalife wrote:

Hi oakisland,

It would be beneficial for others to hear about astrocytoma and Roger's story , if you want to post it. There is a need for everyone to know about brain cancer at every stage..not just the prevalent GBM...

With thanks,

Eternalife.. Thank you for asking. It is not a happy ending, so everybody keep in mind that each case is different, and I pray everyday that nobody gets hit as fast and hard with this as we did.

My Roger was a very healthy, happy, active person. Only 53 years old. As I think back, I starting noticing small changes in his personality (nothing major) in February of 2012. March and April he seemed a little depressed, he had started a new job and kept telling me he was just tired. We were planning our son's wedding , so I thought maybe that empy nest syndrome had something to do with it. Our son got married on May 5th. Several people at the reception noticed that Rog was not himself, when we left he actually tried to drive home with one leg out the car door. It was terrible. The next day he slept all day. Two days later I talked him into going to the Dr. He had a complete physical. He was fine except for a little high blood pressure. 5 days later he sat at our kitchen table for 4 hours to pay 2 bills. I thought he had a stroke and took him to the ER. 3 hours later we got the dx of Brain Cancer. He was admitted to the hospital had the biopsy and sent to Duke . His was a massive tumor on the right frontal lobe. Surgery was not an option. He never gave up, he never stopped believing that this was gonna go away, neither did I. He did radiation 5 days a week for 6 weeks..temador everyday, and avastin once every 2 weeks. I took a leave of absence from work and spent every minute with him..I watched him change from "my rock" to my little boy, and I would love to have the chance to do it all over again. Our life was like a box of chocolates, each day you didn't know what you were going to get. The night of his last radiation treatment he had a seizure that was what I thought at the time the most horrid thing I had ever witnessed. ( he had been on Keppra since his dx). We stayed in the hospital one night and came home. The next day we grilled steaks, during dinner he had another seizure and they just kept coming. We spent the last 5 days of his life in the hospital. It was not pretty. I research all the time trying to fiqure out how this happened. There is no logical explanation for astrocytoma. Just that it sucks.

RE: What about astrocytomas- please

by eternalife on Mon Oct 29, 2012 12:45 AM

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Thank you oakisland for sharing, my  best friend was diagnosed in March with an astrocytoma, only had radiation, chemo would not be suitable. I am sorry to hear about your Roger...none of this is easy. 

for me>my husband is fighting stage iv esophageal cancer right now.. ...it has been 10 months since we started our own journey.

I have been hit with a double whammy, oh yes, of course I lost my father to GBM, so this is thrice facing the demon called cancer.

I hope you will be able to find peace.

Best

 

RE: What about astrocytomas- please

by eternalife on Mon Oct 29, 2012 12:49 AM

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Oh , oakisland.. like you losing our loved ones so fast, cannot compare to some of the stories one can read on this site.

My dad passed in only six months, one surgery, chemo and radiation and he was gone. He lost his ability to speak for at least 3 of the 6 months... go figure....he was only 54.

Take care,

RE: What about astrocytomas- please

by oakisland on Mon Oct 29, 2012 01:29 AM

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Hopefully your friend will be one of the lucky ones. I'm really sorry about your Dad, and I will keep your husband and friend in my prayers. One of our dear friends was dx with cervical cancer this week. I feel bad, but I really can't be there for her right now. Maybe tomorrow. God is watching , sometimes I just wish he would shout at me.

 

 

 

RE: What about astrocytomas- please

by eternalife on Tue Oct 30, 2012 12:22 AM

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Thanks Oakisland,

... keep up the prayers... God doesn't sleep.

Miracles do happen.... remember Bartimaeus, the blind man and Jesus. This week's gospel.

Trust in the Lord.

 

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