Lunasin and Cancer

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Lunasin and Cancer

by davezuro on Tue Oct 01, 2013 11:07 PM

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Has anyone heard of the peptde "Lunasin"?  This amazing discovery has been proven to help cancer patients.  Google "lunasin and cancer" and read the different websites touting its benefit. 

Dr. Alfredo Gavez PhD., discovered Lunasin in 1996 and engineered its extraction to keep it bio-active in the body.  It is a food formulated patented product.  Proven by 30 institutions nationwide for incapsulating cancer. 

It's Simple; Effective; Safe for anyone.

I welcome everyone's thoughts!

RE: Lunasin and Cancer

by davezuro on Mon Nov 18, 2013 03:26 AM

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TechMike-  A few places to learn new info is to go to Dr. Alfredo Galvez PhD Facebook page.  Often he posts updates about the latest studies on lunasin.  Remember, this is all new to the medical industry, therefore, oncologists have yet to endorse it!  The stories that are shared are true!  I personally know over 20 cancer diagnosed patientsdoing great because of lunasin.  Reliv owns the "exclusive rights" to lunasin.  A great souuce of info is Bob Wright of the American Anti-Cancer Institute.  Another source iswww.PubMed.comand type in cancer and lunasin in the search bar.  Over 40 studies appear.  Your thoughts??

RE: Lunasin and Cancer

by PiperPilot on Mon Nov 18, 2013 01:17 PM

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There do not appear to be any RCT (random controlled clinical trials) regarding Lunasin effects on actual human patients...

"Peptides are becoming a group of health-promoting food components with promising chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic properties against cancer. Among them, peptide lunasin, found in soybean and other plants, is turning into one of the most promising. This peptide has been demonstrated its bioavailability after resisting gastrointestinal and serum degradation, and reaching blood and target organs in an intact and active form. Efficacy of lunasin against breast, colon, leukemia and prostate cancer using cell culture experiments and animal models have been revealed in the last decade. These results make lunasin a good candidate for a new generation of chemopreventive/chemotherapeutical agents derived from natural seeds. However, there is still much to be learned about the effects and mechanisms of lunasin on cancer prevention/therapy. The major challenge on the use of lunasin in treating cancer would be the conversion of existing results into clinical outcomes. The next step should be to design clinical trials to confirm lunasin’s chemopreventive properties against different types of cancer. Moreover, genomics, proteomics and biochemical tools should be applied to complete elucidate its molecular mechanism of action. Other aspects, such as searching for lunasin in other seeds, optimization of techniques to enrich products with this peptide and studying lunasin's interactions with other food constituents affecting its activity should also be conducted."

http://www.intechopen.com/books/bioactive-food-peptides-in-h

RE: Lunasin and Cancer

by davezuro on Mon Nov 18, 2013 02:16 PM

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I've been told there are a few random clinical trials on lunasin & cancer.  I don't know which publications they are published in, however, I spoke recently with a cardiologist whose patient has heart disease (very high cholesterol), external shingles and stage 4 lung cancer. 

The cardiologist mentioned he doesn't need to review random clinical trials since he witnessed the shingles disappear and read his oncology report on how his markers went down significantly since taking lunasin.   Additionally, his cholesterol dropped over 70 pts.  Initially, given 6 months to live it has been 1 year and doctors now say his cancer is no longer a threat to his life.  He keeps getting better! 

RE: Lunasin and Cancer

by PiperPilot on Mon Nov 18, 2013 10:46 PM

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What you relate is called an anecdote.

What your cardiologist friend witnessed does not prove that lunasin was the actual or sole cause.  That is one reason why RCT's are considered to be the "gold standard" of scientific proof.

I am not saying that lunasin is ultimately going to fail those tests.  I am just pointing out they have not been done yet. Unless, that is, you can produce any links to peer-reviewed publication of any such studies.

Anyway, there is certainly a lot of interest in these substances.  Time will tell if they can work as well in patients as they seem to do in vitro.

RE: Lunasin and Cancer

by davezuro on Tue Nov 19, 2013 12:16 AM

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There are a few studies onwww.PubMed.com .  On the search bar type in "cancer and lunasin". 

Here's a video summary of the latest studies showing that soy consumption is associated with longer survival and low recurrence among breast cancer patients. Only 5% of all breast cancers are due to inherited BRCA1 or 2 (the Angelina Jolie...gene mutations) with majority of breast cancer cases due to epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes, including BRCA1 and 2.

Soy phytoestrogens are proposed to decrease DNA methylation, an epigenetic mark associated with silencing, although the mechanism of action is yet to be determined. The lunasin peptide is another bioactive agent from soy that has a mechanism of action to explain how epigenetically silenced tumor suppressor genes can be turned back on by increasing histone H4-Lysine 16 acetylation and uncoiling the chromatin (DNA wrapped around the histone core) to allow gene expression.

 http://nutritionfacts.org/video/brca-breast-cancer-genes-and

RE: Lunasin and Cancer

by TechMike on Tue Nov 19, 2013 12:46 AM

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A report titled "Complementary Roles in Cancer Prevention: Protease Inhibitor Makes the Cancer Preventive Peptide Lunasin Bioavailable"  noted that lunasin and Soy Bowman Birk Inhibitor (BBI) are the two main bioactive ingredients of BBI Concentrate (BBIC)  - a known cancer preventive agent now in human clinical trials -  and that lunasin is more efficacious than BBI on an equimolar basis.  Oral administration of 3H-labeled lunasin with lunasin-enriched soy results in 30% of the peptide reaching target tissues in an intact and bioactive form. In a xenograft model of nude mice transplanted with human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells, intraperitoneal injections of lunasin, at 20 mg/kg and 4 mg/kg body weight, decrease tumor incidence by 49% and 33%, respectively, compared with the vehicle-treated group. In contrast, injection with BBI at 20 mg/kg body weight shows no effect on tumor incidence. Tumor generation is significantly reduced with the two doses of lunasin, while BBI is ineffective. Lunasin inhibits cell proliferation and induces cell death in the breast tumor sections. Conclusions/Significance: We conclude that lunasin is actually the bioactive cancer preventive agent in BBIC, and BBI simply protects lunasin from digestion when soybean and other seed foods are eaten by humans.

So far, clinical trials have been limited to the bioavailability of lunasin peptides.  In vitro and in vivo studies using human cancer cells show results significant enough for each study to postulate human efficacy.  (I can't find any negative studies.)

RE: Lunasin and Cancer

by PiperPilot on Tue Nov 19, 2013 01:27 AM

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Gents.  Please read what I wrote.  I have read the studies.  But there are still no published studies of completedrandom controlled trials in humans - yet.  Their may be trials ongoing but nothing has been published about them.

What works in vitro or in vivo may or may not work in human patients or the clinic.  That is my only point.

RE: Lunasin and Cancer

by TechMike on Tue Nov 19, 2013 02:01 AM

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Your comment is why I posted the study I did.  The current clinical trial (still proceeding) is showing significant results of the lunasin component of BBIC and negligible results with the BBI component.  It's not double-blind, but it's clinically valid and peer-reviewed.  Remember, this is research to validate why earlier clinical trials on soy's efficacy succeeded (earning medical community endorsement), and why subsequent results did not maintain earlier successes (later studies used soy protein stripped of its lunasin). 

RE: Lunasin and Cancer

by daus334 on Tue Nov 19, 2013 03:25 AM

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On Nov 19, 2013 1:27 AM PiperPilot wrote:

Gents.  Please read what I wrote.  I have read the studies.  But there are still no published studies of completedrandom controlled trials in humans - yet.  Their may be trials ongoing but nothing has been published about them.

What works in vitro or in vivo may or may not work in human patients or the clinic.  That is my only point.

PiperPilot has a very valid point. Human efficacy of any drug or supplement cannot be postulated without properly radomized controlled clinical trials. I appreciate that many of us may have experienced significant positive effects from some alternative treatments, and these treatments may indeed appear very effective in the end. However, without clinical trials it is not possible to make any conclusions as to whether or not these treatments will be effective in other people or what will be the proportion of patients for which these treatments will be effective. I would say that it is very strange and probably inappropriate for a doctor (cardiologist) to make a statement that he doesn't need to review outcomes of random clinical trials. 

I am definitely not against alternative/unproven treatment approaches - every scientifically proven treatment had to go through a stage when it was 'alternative' and 'unproven'. I myself have so far been using only an 'unproven' technique for my blood cancer (myelofibrosis), and with significant success so far. 

Is lunasin worth trying? Possibly, yes. There is indeed a significant body of evidence suggesting that it might be effective at least in some cases (maybe just for cancer prevention, as, according to some research, it has little impact on established cancer cells). If you wish to take or try lunasin and believe that it might help you, then it might be a good idea to do this.    

However, we always need a definitive and rigorous scientific proof before we can claim or postulate the universal efficacy or suitability of a method, or a drug, or a supplement (which typically does not exist anyway).  

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