Cancer Blog

Here's our collection of cancer-related stories. We sift through a variety of stories and share the issues that we think matter to cancer patients, caregivers, healthcare providers and survivors. Learn about current events in the cancer community, human interest stories, and promising technology and treatment advances. Tell us what you think in the Comments section at the bottom of each post.

Note: The information contained in this service is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider prior to starting any new treatment or with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Nothing contained in the service is intended to be used for medical diagnosis or treatment of any illness, condition or disease.

Jan

16

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Benefits of Removing Reproductive Organs to Reduce Cancer Risk

by: cancercompass

Women with BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutations could reduce their breast cancer risk by 50% and ovarian/fallopian tube cancer risk by 80% if they have their ovaries and fallopian tubes removed. That's according to a report published online in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Previous studies have shown reductions in breast cancer risk with risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy (RRSO), a procedure that removes the ovaries and fallopian tubes.

Researchers from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine analyzed the results of 10 published studies to get a better understanding of this procedure's benefit in reducing breast and ovarian cancer risks.

Learn more about what scientists have learned about salpingo-oophorectomy in an editorial published in the January 13th edition of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

 

Jan

16

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New Research Backs Old Theory about Root Cause of Cancer

by: cancercompass

New research is giving weight to an 85-year-old theory that cancer is the result of irreversible cellular injury, an idea that fell by the wayside when scientists discovered genomic mutations.

Researchers from Boston College and the Washington School of Medicine confirmed German scientist Otto Warburg's cancer theory in their recent study of brain tumors in mice.

A recent ScienceDaily article explains the Warburg Cancer Theory, first proposed in 1924, as impairment to a cell's energy metabolism - found in its mitochondria.  A process called glycolysis, which is the breakdown of glucose within the mitochondria, is found in most types of cancer cancers.

Though Warburg won a Nobel Prize for the theory, it caused controversy among scientists.  This recent study gives new information supporting Warburg's original theory.

Study authors found that abnormalities in a lipid, known as cardiolipin, impairs mitochondrial function and energy production, thus supporting the need for maintaining the structural integrity of a cell's inner mitochondrial membrane, according to ScienceDaily.

The study was recently published in the Journal of Lipid Research.

 

Jan

15

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What is Cancer?

by: leftona

What Is Cancer?

I just read a blog post by a practicing internist in the Midwest who writes under the pseudonym PalMD. He did such a fantastic job in explaining the basics of cancer in a few short paragraphs that I though I would use this space to share just a few highlights of the post and provide a link so that those who are interested can read the full post for themselves. Here’s part of what PalMD had to say:

Cancer isn't a single disease----it's over a hundred different diseases with certain commonalities

Most cancers are named for the tissue in which they originated.

If a cell develops a genetic defect which makes it forget to die, it stays where it is instead of making way for new cells. A mass of identical, immortal cells that keep dividing is called a tumor.

A tumor, whether benign or malignant, can cause problems just by taking up space. Still, cancerous tumors have some especially nasty properties. They not only take up space, but they actually invade nearby tissues, growing into them and destroying them.

Different types of cancer behave differently.

If someone tosses you the C-word, after the shock wears off, it's time to get to work. Find out what you're really dealing with. Demystify, gain knowledge, empower yourself.

PalMD’s original post can be found at: http://scienceblogs.com/denialism/2008/09/cancer_101.php

“Demystify, Gain Knowledge, Empower Yourself” … I can’t think of a better message to end on.

The author of this post is Adam Lefton. Adam is Director of Online Development for Cancer Treatment Centers of America and has been advocating on behalf of cancer patients since 1999. Questions and comments for Adam can be posted directly on this blog.
Adam is not a trained medical professional and the information provided in this blog is for information purposes only. Every person has their own unique medical situation and those reading this blog should seek the advice of their own medical professional.
Jan

07

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Obesity Linked to Lymphedema Risk in Breast Cancer Survivors

by: cancercompass

New research links obesity to increased risk of lymphedema, a chronic swelling condition affecting many breast cancer survivors.

University of Missouri researchers say a woman's risk of developing lymphedema increases 40 to 60% if her body mass index (BMI) is classified as overweight or obese compared to normal weight women.

Researchers said lymphedema is a risk for two-thirds of breast cancer survivors in the first 30 months following surgery.  

Increased health education was recommended by the study's authors.

Learn more about lymphedema management for breast cancer survivors.

 

Jan

07

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Researchers Form Cancer Drug Discovery Company

by: cancercompass

Founded by leading researchers from the Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, FORMA Therapeutics announced its debut as a global drug discovery company this week.

The company says it has already received $25 million in funding to further genetic study of human cancers.

From the research, scientists are looking to create new oncology drugs, according to a press release from FORMA, located in Cambridge, Mass.


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