Cancer Blog

Here's our collection of cancer-related stories. We sift through a variety of stories and share the issues that we think matter to cancer patients, caregivers, healthcare providers and survivors. Learn about current events in the cancer community, human interest stories, and promising technology and treatment advances. Tell us what you think in the Comments section at the bottom of each post.

Note: The information contained in this service is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider prior to starting any new treatment or with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Nothing contained in the service is intended to be used for medical diagnosis or treatment of any illness, condition or disease.

Mar

11

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Study Says Women Age 80+ Receive Few Mammography Benefits

by: cancercompass

A new study published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology claims women 80 years and older receive few benefits from a mammography.

Researchers from the Harvard Medical School and Boston University Schools of Medicine and Public Health examined the outcomes of mammography screening for 2,011 women without a history of breast cancer, who were 80 or older between 1994 and 2004. The majority of patients were non-Hispanic white.

Researchers found a little more than half of the women received a mammography since turning 80. Among women who were screened: eight were diagnosed with ductal carcinoma in situ, 16 had an early stage of disease, two received a late stage diagnosis and one woman died from breast cancer.

Overall, 11% of the women screened experienced a false-positive test result, while 12.5% of women were just burdened by the tests.  

Study authors concluded, "There were no significant differences in the rate, stage, recurrence rate, or deaths due to breast cancer between women who were screened and those who were not screened."

 

Mar

11

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Research Suggests a Combination of Cancer Screenings for Early Detection

by: cancercompass

New research suggests that whole-body cancer screening with other selected forms of testing can detect a wide variety of early-stage cancers.

Japanese researchers evaluated common cancer screening methods on 1,197 healthy volunteers aged 35 and older.  Annual cancer screenings for five years were conducted along with long-term follow-up. Those cancer screenings included:

  •     Whole body Fluoeodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET)
  •     Chest and abdominal computed tomography (CT)
  •     Brain and pelvic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)
  •     Tumor markers
  •     Fecal occult blood testing
Study results published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology this month, reported 22 primary cancers that were pathologically confirmed.

 

Mar

11

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BRCA Positive Women Opting for Mastectomies

by: cancercompass

More women who have test positive for mutations in the BRCA genes are opting for mastectomies as a preventative measure against breast cancer, say researchers at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston.

The researchers surveyed 312 women, of which 86 tested positive for a BRCA gene mutation. Researchers found that 70% of the women who tested positive felt a mastectomy was the most effective preventative measure against developing breast cancer, compared to the 40% of women who tested negative, but also agreed that a preventative mastectomy was their best course of action.

Researchers said eight out of 10 women or 81% who felt a mastectomy was their best preventative measure decided to undergo the procedure.

Study authors concluded that a woman's choice to undergo a preventative mastectomy was dependent upon BRCA genetic testing results.

Study findings were issued in a press release by the American Cancer Society in advance of the study's publication in the April issue of the journal Cancer.

 

 

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