Cancer Blog

Here's our collection of cancer-related stories. We sift through a variety of stories and share the issues that we think matter to cancer patients, caregivers, healthcare providers and survivors. Learn about current events in the cancer community, human interest stories, and promising technology and treatment advances. Tell us what you think in the Comments section at the bottom of each post.

Note: The information contained in this service is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider prior to starting any new treatment or with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Nothing contained in the service is intended to be used for medical diagnosis or treatment of any illness, condition or disease.

Aug

18

Permalink Comment RSS (0)

A "White Diet" to Combat Nausea

by Dana Demas

Chemotherapy can cause a variety of problems that interfere with a healthy appetite and – as a result – a healthy diet.

Nausea is a very common problem, especially the day of treatment. Many patients come to dread the treatment that is helping them, because it makes them feel so terrible. Some patients eat a “white meal” the day of chemotherapy. The soft, bland food can help reduce the risk of stomach discomfort and digestive upset.

Meals made of soft, white foods are also good to eat after chemotherapy – which can damage the fast-growing cells in the mouth and throat, leading to pain or increased sensitivity while eating.

Some white foods that are easy to eat include:

  • Cooked white rice
  • White bread or crackers
  • Pasta
  • Potatoes (mashed, baked, etc.)
  • Grits or other hot cereal
  • Yogurt (plain or vanilla)

And because it’s always good to have a well-rounded diet, when eating “non-white” foods, try incorporating real ginger at mealtime to ease digestion and combat nausea: track down some real ginger ale, brew some ginger tea, or freeze the tea into ginger ice cubes for a quick and soothing treat.

Aug

18

Permalink Comment RSS (0)

Children's Book Tackles Questions About Cancer

by: cancercompass

A children's book titled The Great Katie Kate Tackles Questions About Cancer reveals the world of a little girl named Suzy and her recent cancer diagnosis.

After Suzy is told that she may have cancer at her doctor's office, she becomes introduced to two characters: The Great Katie Kate and Worry Wombat.

"Don't be afraid of the Worry Wombat, Suzy," The Great Katie Kate tells her in the book."If you ask enough questions and smile whenever you can, the Worry Wombat will shrink and disappear."

As Suzy learns more about how she will be tested and treated for her condition from The Great Katie Kate, the Worry Wombat becomes smaller and smaller.

What books do you recommend for coping with cancer? Do you have suggestions for pediatric cancer? Please tell us what you recommend in the comments section below.

Aug

17

Permalink Comment RSS (0)

Study: Most Countries Sympathetic Toward Lung Cancer Patients

by: cancercompass

A new multi-national study commissioned by The Global Lung Cancer Coalition to discover attitudes toward lung cancer found that most countries reject the idea that they are less sympathetic toward those with the disease.

Research company Ipsos MORI conducted the survey in 16 countries, which included: Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Bulgaria, Canada, Great Britain, Italy, Japan, Norway, Spain, Denmark, Switzerland, Slovenia, Sweden, the Netherlands, and the USA.

The study found that 29 percent of Australians and 28 percent of Brazilians were less sympathetic toward those with lung cancer. Those two countries were ranked the least sympathetic nations among the 16 surveyed countries. Conversely, only ten percent of Argentineans had less sympathy towards those with lung cancer, which was the lowest of all surveyed countries.

What are your thoughts regarding this study?

To learn more about the cancer featured in this article, please visit our lung cancer information page.

Aug

16

Permalink Comment RSS (0)

Brides Against Breast Cancer Tour

by: cancercompass

Brides Against Breast Cancer Nationwide Tour of Gowns kicked off last weekend in St. Louis, MO and has 16 more scheduled stops until April 2011.

Brides Against Breast Cancer is an organization that helps brides-to-be purchase wedding dresses at discounted rates whilst raising funds to benefit Making Memories - an organization that grants wishes for metastatic breast cancer patients.

Wedding dresses are priced from $99 to $799, and couture designer dresses - priced up to $20,000 - are discounted 25 to 75 percent.

"Brides Against Breast Cancer program has received more than 50,000 wedding gown donations, with an estimated resale value of over 4 million dollars," according to the organization's website.

Check out the Nationwide Tour of Gowns schedule if you're interested in participating.

For more information regarding the cancer featured in this post, please visit our breast cancer information page.

Aug

12

Permalink Comment RSS (0)

Study: Obese Men Could Benefit From Early Colon Cancer Screening

by: cancercompass

According to a new study published in Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, younger, obese men had similar odds of having abnormal colon cells as older, slimmer men. This led researchers to state that young, obese men may benefit from earlier colon cancer screenings.

The study, conducted by researchers at Konkuk University in Seoul, stated this in the conclusion: "In average-risk individuals 40 to 49 years of age, men with abdominal obesity or metabolic syndrome might benefit from screening colonoscopy starting at 45 years of age to detect colorectal neoplasm." The age one normally receives colon cancer screenings is 50 years old.

However, some experts disagree."The idea that you're tailoring screening to age and some combination of risk factors is entirely reasonable," Robert Smith, the director of cancer screening at the American Cancer Society, told Reuters. "But attempts to draw those conclusions now is a bit premature, because most colorectal polyps don't become cancers."

What are your thoughts regarding this study?

To learn more about the cancer featured in this post, please visit our colon cancer information page.

 

Aug

12

Permalink Comment RSS (0)

Mad Men Auctions Clothing to Benefit Lung Cancer Program

by: cancercompass

AMC's hit television show Mad Men is known for its characters' iconic 60s style. Characters like Betty Draper and Joan Harris don gorgeous dresses, shoes and accessories in nearly all episodes.

Not only are the characters exquisitely dressed, but the sets are decorated with the utmost thought and precision with 60s props and furniture. And now it could be yours.

Lionsgate, which is Mad Men's producer, has teamed together with Auction Cause for a charity auction to benefit the Lung Cancer Program at City of Hope. The event will be a 10-day eBay auction beginning Thursday at 7pm PST.

One reason Lionsgate may have focused on lung cancer could be that several of Mad Men's characters seem to regularly have a cigarette and a tumbler of scotch in hand.

“This auction offers Mad Men fans an exciting new way to connect with the series while helping to support City of Hope’s important work in research and treatment of lung cancer,” Sandra Stern, Lionsgate’s COO of TV, told People Magazine.

To learn more about the cancer featured in this post, please visit the lung cancer information page.

Aug

11

Permalink Comment RSS (0)

Dentists 'Smile Pink' for Breast Cancer Awareness

by: cancercompass

What do dentists and breast cancer have in common? A new initiative called Smile Pink, which promotes the early detection for breast cancer development. Over five hundred dentists across the United States have come together for the cause.

So what is Smile Pink? One simply purchases a Pink Swarovski Crystal and applies it to the tooth of their choice, using a temporary adhesive.

"Smile Pink is a fresh and innovative campaign that will help spread awareness about the importance of funding lifesaving breast cancer research, while giving patients the opportunity to brighten their smiles," Lucretia Gilbert, Director of Development at The Breast Cancer Research Foundation®, stated in a news release.

Smile Pink will donate 100 percent of the funds from the iniative to The Breast Cancer Research Foundation®.

To learn more about the cancer featured in this post, please visit our breast cancer information page.

Aug

10

Permalink Comment RSS (0)

"Best Diet Ever," Top 5 Foods to Cut Cancer Risk

by: cancercompass

The San Francisco Chronicle published an interesting article Monday regarding the top five foods to help decrease one's risk of developing cancer.

The research surrounding these foods was developed by Dr. John Farquhar who founded Stanford University's Prevention Research Center. He also teaches a course at the university titled "The Best Diet Ever," which dives deeper into why these foods are beneficial.

"There's still uncertainty about how important nutrition is in cancer prevention," Farquhar told the publication, "but I've found that if you deal with these specific foods, there's evidence that they all have cancer-fighting nutrients. As opposed to genetics, nutrition is something that people can control."

The Top 5 Foods Are:

  • Berries
  • Broccoli
  • Onions - onions, garlic, leeks or shallots.
  • Soy - tofu, soy nuts, soy milk or edamame.
  • Tomatoes

 

Aug

10

Permalink Comment RSS (0)

Study: Puberty Starting Earlier for Girls, Cancer Concerns

by: cancercompass

According to a new study published in the journal Pediatrics, there are more girls developing breasts at younger ages than there were 10 to 30 years earlier.

The study's conclusion states that girls as young as ages 7 and 8 – particularly among white girls – are developing earlier than their older counterparts.

The study was paid for in part by Breast Cancer and the Environment Research Centers. This group studies the possible effects of environmental exposures in relation to breast cancer development.

“It’s certainly throwing up a warning flag,” Dr. Frank M. Biro, the study's first author, told The New York Times. “I think we need to think about the stuff we’re exposing our bodies to and the bodies of our kids. This is a wake-up call, and I think we need to pay attention to it.”

The publication further stated that increased obesity rates may also contribute to earlier puberty development as body fat can produce sex hormones.

To learn more about the cancer featured in this post, please visit our breast cancer information page.

Aug

06

Permalink Comment RSS (0)

Report: More Obesity Means More Cancer

by: cancercompass

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released new figures on Tuesday regarding obesity rates in the United States - 26.7 percent of Americans are considered obese.

Furthermore, no state met the Healthy People 2010 goal of reducing adult obesity to 15%.

The American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) issued a news release following the CDCs statements claiming that those obese Americans - 72.5 million people - face a higher risk of developing certain cancers. These include colon cancer, breast cancer, kidney cancer and more.

“Obesity plays a central role in many cancers,” AICR Director of Research Susan Higginbotham, PhD, RD noted in the news release. “Its links to heart disease and diabetes are well-known, but Americans need to understand that more obesity today means more cancer tomorrow.”

The Department of Health & Human Services, the creator of Healthy People 2010, is continuing its efforts with Developing Healthy People 2020. This effort would like to refine "successful weight loss to a sustained weight reduction" of 5 to 10 percent.

What are your thoughts regarding this issue?

To learn more about the cancers featured in this article, please visit our cancer information page.

We care about your feedback. Let us know how we can improve your CancerCompass experience.