Considering mannose.

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Considering mannose.

by Baloo on Sat Nov 24, 2018 04:06 PM

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Here's a couple of articles about mannose that could be of interest to those seeking alternative cancer treatments. Mannose is a sugar related to glucose, that has some interesting properties. Mannose naturally occurs in some plants, like cranberries. It's available over the counter as an unregulated supplement.

I've pretty well exhausted conventional medical treatments and have now turned to alternative ones. If they probably- won't -hurt and might help I have nothing to lose so here's another I am considering. Mannose has been used to prevent and treat urinary tract infections and has a pretty good history of being safe. Of course figuring out a safe dose which might affect cancer is tricky, so I'll just guess and use the urinary tract infection guidelines.

I find it hilarious that chemotherapy drugs,  despite the horrific side effects, are the first line used against cancer. Very few, if any, treatments seem be to  available that combine traditional chemistry with alternative treatments. Which of course makes sense because few of them have been sudied properly and sadly are unlikely to ever be, although the literature is full of interesting snippets of information on promising alternative therapies. It's difficult to assess if some threapy or other is a total lie or has some truth to it worth exploring.    I'm still suffering from the side effects of 2 years of conventional chemo, which of course has failed,  as it was expected to- but we're all cautioned to be wary of other products that are far more benign. Not that I think there are any conspiracies to hide natural  cancer cures, but because to me it seems that the cancer industry is more willing to accept toxicity from conventional treatments more easily than unknown or unproven alternatives.

Of course the dose makes the poison, but really.With a little bit of research and caution, some of these alternatives are worth a try particularly when there's nothing left to lose. And, of course, anyone pregnant or with any metabolic  or other diseases needs to be extra cautious trying these (mostly unproven  in the strict sense of scientific studies-  (but who can wait??? My timeline is a matter of months-)- but lots of anecdotal evidence in some cases) alternatives. 

The cautionary paper:

MANNOSE METABOLISM: MORE THAN MEETS THE EYE

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4252654/

A quote from the paper: "Mannose can be a life saving therapeutic and a non-antibiotic treatment for selected bacterial infections [3], but in other situations it can be lethal [4] or teratogenic [5], underscoring the importance of stringent regulation of mannose metabolism."

Also: "Human plasma contains ~50μM mannose which is primarily derived from N-glycan processing [19]. Mannose is absorbed through the intestine and metabolized. A bolus of <0.2g/Kg body weight increases mannose concentration by 3-fold with a clearance T1/2of ~ 4hr, without affecting glucose concentration. Higher doses cause mild gastro-intestinal discomfort, but no other side effects [44]. Pregnant women with diabetes mellitus show elevated mannose levels in fasted blood and amniotic fluid which correlated with high glucose concentration [45] and several show that mannose levels are closely linked to glucose metabolism [46,47]. How this impacts glycosylation is not known".

but here's another quote, same paper:

"Currently, there are no reports of adverse effects of mannose in humans."

Which does not mean that huge doses are benign, just unreported.

As far as  a recommended dose goes, here's a paper:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23633128/

that used 2 g of D-mannose powder in 200 ml of water daily for 6 months to treat urinary tract infections:

 D-mannose powder for prophylaxis of recurrent urinary tract infections in women: a randomized clinical trial.

"Patients in D-mannose group had a significantly lower risk of side effects compared to patients in Nitrofurantoin  (a traditional antibiotic) group" (although Nitrofurantoin was well tolerated)

Conclusions: "In our study, D-mannose powder had significantly reduced the risk of recurrent UTI which was no different than in Nitrofurantoin group. More studies will be needed to validate the results of this study, but initial findings show that D-mannose may be useful for UTI prevention"

Here's the article on mannose and cancer:

Sugar supplement could be used to fight cancer, research suggests

https://www.breakingnews.ie/world/sugar-supplement-could-be-

Worth a try, I think. My goal at this point is to try and kill or at least slow the cancer by using the death-by-a- thousand -cuts stragtegy.

RE: Considering mannose.

by caseyzson on Mon Nov 26, 2018 09:19 PM

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hi Baloo,

Thank you for responding to my other thread with your comments, I thought I would answer here since I had a follow up question regarding Mannose.

I'm sorry that you decided against that trial, but it may have been for the better given your analysis.  My mother failed two clinical trials. Her current oncologist is more in favor of repurposing active chemo agents in other cancers before trials (as most trials lack single agent activity).  

Are you looking into High Dose Vitamin C or Radiation at all?  My mother does IV Vitamin C, on top of low dose chemotherapy, and we are looking to add radiation for her liver metastases at some point.  

The Ars Technica article on Mannose is a good one, but I also read through the actual Nature journal.  I'm wondering how easily absorbed mannose is in the Gut (as a supplement) to actually reproduce the effects stated in the article.

In the same way Oral Vitamin C vs. IV Vitamin C is different in terms of blood absorbtion, I wonder if Mannose is the same.  Although the paper does say it is absorbed well through the intestine, I wonder if supplements are the same.

Have you already started taking it?  I think my mother will start this soon right before chemotherapy.  As the Nature paper says, in cell culture, Mannose by itself does not have a killing effect, but makes cancer cells more suspectible to the cytotoxics they used.  Also, as you know, culture does not equal human, but in desperate times, we look for low risk / high rewards, while still staying on top of relevant studies and approved treatments as you have done.

Also, have you looked into Mebendenzaloe or Hydroxychloroquine (authphagy inhibitor?)

Thanks for posting!  

RE: Considering mannose.

by caseyzson on Tue Nov 27, 2018 02:56 PM

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Hi Baloo...it seems my other comment did not post, that happens a lot with this site..anyway:

Thank you for responsding to my other thread with your comments, I thought I would answer here since I had a follow up in regards to Mannose.  I'm sorry that you decided against the trial, but it may have been for the better given your analysis of it.  My mother failed two clinical trials and her current oncologist is more in favor of reporurposing active chemo agents before trials.

Have you started on Mannose yet?  I wonder how the biovavailability will be in the gut.  I bought my mother some but we are waiting until next week to start.  From the Nature paper, it seems that it can act like a trojan horse making the cancer cells take up Mannose instead of glucose, and might work with a cytotoxic agent.

Have you looked into Mebendazole or Fenbendazole (the anti-paristic drugs)?  They are part of the Repurposing Drugs intiative.  

My mother also takes Hydroxychloroquine to try and block the autophagy capabilities of the cancer.  Metformin is another drug we have but have not taken.  We are looking into radiation for her liver mets, and hoping a good clinical trial comes up as well, but as of now there are none I see.

RE: Considering mannose.

by Baloo on Thu Nov 29, 2018 04:28 PM

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On Nov 27, 2018 2:56 PM caseyzson wrote:

Hi Baloo...it seems my other comment did not post, that happens a lot with this site..anyway:

Thank you for responsding to my other thread with your comments, I thought I would answer here since I had a follow up in regards to Mannose.  I'm sorry that you decided against the trial, but it may have been for the better given your analysis of it.  My mother failed two clinical trials and her current oncologist is more in favor of reporurposing active chemo agents before trials.

Have you started on Mannose yet?  I wonder how the biovavailability will be in the gut.  I bought my mother some but we are waiting until next week to start.  From the Nature paper, it seems that it can act like a trojan horse making the cancer cells take up Mannose instead of glucose, and might work with a cytotoxic agent.

Have you looked into Mebendazole or Fenbendazole (the anti-paristic drugs)?  They are part of the Repurposing Drugs intiative.  

My mother also takes Hydroxychloroquine to try and block the autophagy capabilities of the cancer.  Metformin is another drug we have but have not taken.  We are looking into radiation for her liver mets, and hoping a good clinical trial comes up as well, but as of now there are none I see.

Hi caseyzson,

No I haven't tried mannose yet, I still need to order it from my pharmacist.

From what I understand, mannose is absorbed efficently from the gut .

I'm no longer on any type of "official" chemo so I've lost my chance to use other chemistries in concurrently with the folfirinox. I was apparently never eligible for radiation because of the metastasis. I did look into the antihelminthics, and other antibiotics, and also metformin, but protocol being what it is here and having a not- very- open- minded oncologist squashed those ideas.

I had such an imflammed gut at one point I insisted on  parasite/ infection tests to rule those out, but they came back negative. I had secretly hoped I'd contracted Giardia or whatever  and so could justify the use of metronidazole. But the tests came back clear.

I have read about vitamin C but I don't think I am comfortable with the idea of intravenous infusions given by anyone other than the traditional medical system. This is in the might- hurt- and -there's- not --great evidence-- that -it -helps - much category,  in my mind. I'm all for these alternative treatments being tried, but I have to be convinced that they are safe,  and that that  I'm not being soaked by some lowlife who is trying to take monetary advantage of desperate people.

It's hard enough just to get people in the traditional medical system to wash their hands and I'm very leery of the possibility of quack naturopaths and alternative treatments I don't have control over-  not so much the profession but how well they are regulated and how good the particular one I get might be (same is true for everything though...)  although I will probably end up at their doorstep at some point. I am not keen on the risk of septicemia! 

One other treatment of interest that I will probably look in to is the alphalipoic acid (ALA) and low dose naltrexone one. I can get this his therapy in Ontario. Personally would feel more comfortatble taking the ALA orally rather than via intravenous. Here's a useful monograph on alphalipoic acid:

Professional Resource:
Alpha Lipoic Acid (ALA)

http://www.oicc.ca/uploads/ala-health-professional.pdf

RE: Considering mannose.

by Baloo on Fri Nov 30, 2018 05:53 PM

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Finally found the link to the original paper, published in Nature. Unfortunately it's difficult to extrapolate an experimental human dose from the experimental design. It might work, it might not, but the results from this experiment are intriguing.

Mannose impairs tumour growth and enhances
chemotherapy

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-018-0729-3.epdf?refer

RE: Considering mannose.

by caseyzson on Tue Dec 04, 2018 11:28 PM

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I read that paper, its encouraging to hear that Mannose is able to be aborbed so readily in the lining...hopefully that means it's able to be metabolized as many supplements aren't able to be absorbed at all in the doses that are recommended.

Have you added this to your regimin?  It seems as if this + Vitamin C IV could be beneficial, or this + a chemo agent.

RE: Considering mannose.

by Baloo on Wed Dec 05, 2018 02:52 PM

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I haven't yet, I am going to  order on line. I've considered vitamin C but for some reason it makes me very nervous.... not sure if it's for me. it's something to consider in the future though,  if all else fails. I'm off chemotherapy, enough already. I'm trying for quality of life at this point.  For now, it's cannabis oil, CBD oil, Boswellia, cucurmin and CoEnzyme Q10 (400 mg), just in case any are effective at stretching this out. I'll add themannose and go on a ketogenic diet once I get that.  The coQ10 has a number of benefits, in addition to making the cannabis oil seem less psychoactive.

 

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