My-Cancer

2 Posts | Page(s): 1 

My-Cancer

by Goodbook on Sat Sep 21, 2019 09:27 AM

Quote | Reply
YOU may be one of the many women world wide asking this worrisome question. Will there be a positive answer soon? What conclusions were drawn at the Fourth Mastology Congress in Campinas, Brazil? In February of 1977 some 500 international specialists met there to share their findings in the field of mastology, the medical science dealing with the breast and its diseases. The program focused on breast cancer, its diagnosis, prevention and treatment. We invite you to consider some of the highlights. Prevalence and Cause Breast cancer has become a scourge of our times. In the United States alone, it has reached epidemic proportions, with 90,000 cases a year. Unhappily, the disease catches up with one in every 13 American women. Although there is a chance of a cure, if discovered in time, breast cancer is now the leading cause of cancer death among women in the United States, killing 26 in every 100,000. Other countries, such as England and France, are not much better off. In fact, about 4 percent of all adult women in the Western world are affected. Only in Latin America are the women more afflicted by cancer of the uterus and skin, while breast cancer ranks in third place, with 10 fatalities in 100,000. For yet unknown reasons, Oriental women are less subject to breast cancer. Despite the lack of complete international data, it was observed at the Congress that mortality due to breast cancer has remained the same for 40 years. Women of middle age succumb more frequently and there is a high-risk age group between 40 and 65, the risk going up with age. Furthermore, women in so-called developed countries are more prone to breast cancer than are those living in less developed lands. Hence, some doctors are inclined to see a link between breast cancer and the degree of a community’s development. Others regard fewer children, artificial feeding, greater intake of fatty foods?—all characteristic of life in developed countries—?as the potential causes. Whatever the actual causes may be, breast cancer starts as a small, painless lump. It grows in size, may spread to the lymph nodes in the armpit and sometimes to the lymph nodes where the ribs join the breastbone. As long as it is halted at these nodes, it is operable and curable. Early Detection?—Surest Way to Combat Breast Cancer The doctors at the Congress stressed unanimously that the key to curing breast cancer lies in its early discovery. After preliminary biopsy, surgical removal is possible. The smaller the lump at detection, the greater the probability of a cure, which may be as high as 95 percent. For this reason, the countries where breast cancer is killer number one are making concentrated efforts to help women to detect cancer when it is still small. Publicity campaigns alert the women, teach self-examination and advise periodical medical checkups. In the United States, the women themselves discover 90 percent of the lumps by palpating (feeling) the breast. But besides this simple method, there are modern scientific methods of diagnosis. So what should you do if you discover a lump? First, a false sense of shame or fear could put your life in jeopardy. Remember that a tumor may or may not be malignant. In fact, most lumps are said to be harmless. Nevertheless, consult a doctor at once. Never forget that if it is cancer, the hope of successful treatment is greater if the disease is diagnosed at an early stage and the lump is surgically removed. It is said that, in most cases, the removal of cancerous lumps prolongs a person’s life. If there is no new cancer after some years, the stage of “no comeback” may be reached. On the other hand, a malignant tumor may double in size every 55 to 110 days, even in as few as 22 days. So, of what methods of early detection can you avail yourself? The following were discussed at the Mastology Congress.

RE: My-Cancer

by rivazuma on Sat Sep 28, 2019 06:00 AM

Quote | Reply

nice information

2 Posts | Page(s): 1 
Subscribe to this message board discussion

Latest Messages

View More

We care about your feedback. Let us know how we can improve your CancerCompass experience.