Hyperaric oxygen to treat radiation side effects

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Hyperaric oxygen to treat radiation side effects

by mitzy1946 on Wed Aug 06, 2008 12:00 AM

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Does anyone have any info of the use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) to treat long term side effects of whole brain radiation? "The most common condition treated at the Jacobi Hyperbaric Medicine Program is tissue injury caused by radiation therapy for cancer of the head and neck. HBOT provides a better healing environment and leads to growth of new blood in a process called re-vascularization."

RE: Hyperaric oxygen to treat radiation side effects

by jcr65566 on Wed Aug 06, 2008 12:00 AM

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On 8/6/2008 mitzy1946 wrote:

Does anyone have any info of the use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) to treat long term side effects of whole brain radiation? "The most common condition treated at the Jacobi Hyperbaric Medicine Program is tissue injury caused by radiation therapy for cancer of the head and neck. HBOT provides a better healing environment and leads to growth of new blood in a process called re-vascularization."

Now this is amazing The only time Iv heard of it is when I was doing a PEDA, scuba, dive, master, instructor, cause, about 20 years a go. Back then It was called Hyperbaric Medicine. I thought it was just use to treat decompression sickness. It amzing it can treat damage from brain radiation. thats very good to hear as a few patient have  come on the CC web site and ask about some thing to help them or a family member. I got this off the net from Wikipedia site addressat at

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyperbaric_medicine

  • The increased overall pressure is of therapeutic value when HBOT is used in the treatment of decompression sickness and air embolism.
  • For many other conditions, the therapeutic principle of HBOT lies in a drastically increased partial pressure of oxygen in the tissues of the body. The oxygen partial pressures achievable under HBOT are much higher than those under breathing pure oxygen at normobaric conditions (i.e. at normal atmospheric pressure).
  • A related effect is the increased oxygen transport capacity of the blood. Under atmospheric pressure, oxygen transport is limited by the oxygen binding capacity of hemoglobin in red blood cells and very little oxygen is transported by blood plasma. Because the hemoglobin of the red blood cells is almost saturated with oxygen under atmospheric pressure, this route of transport cannot be exploited any further. Oxygen transport by plasma, however is significantly increased under HBOT.

The United States, the Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society, known as UHMS, approved for reimbursement diagnoses for application of HBOT in hospitals. The following approved indications are approved uses of hyperbaric oxygen therapy as defined by the UHMS Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy Committee.[1] The Committee Report can be purchased directly through the UHMS

  • Air or gas embolism[2]
  • Carbon monoxide poisoning[3][4]
    • Carbon Monoxide Poisoning Complicated by Cyanide Poisoning[5][6][7]
  • Clostridal Myositis and Myonecrosis[8] (Gas gangrene[9][10])
  • Crush Injury, Compartment syndrome, and other Acute Traumatic Ischemias[11][12]
  • Decompression sickness[13][14][15]
  • Enhancement of Healing in Selected Problem Wounds[16][17][18]
  • Exceptional Blood Loss[19][20] (Anemia)
  • Intracranial Abscess[21][22]
  • Necrotizing Soft Tissue Infections[23] (Necrotizing fasciitis[24])
  • Osteomyelitis[25][26][27] (Refractory)
  • Delayed Radiation Injury[28] (Soft Tissue and Bony Necrosis[29][30])
  • Skin Grafts & Flaps[31][32] (Compromised)
  • Thermal Burns[33][34]

In the United States, HBOT is recognized by Medicare as a reimbursable treatment for 14 UHMS "approved" conditions. An HBOT session costs anywhere from $100 to $200 in private clinics, to over $1,000 in hospitals. More U.S. physicians are lawfully prescribing HBOT for "off label" conditions such as Lyme Disease and stroke and also in Autism and related disorders like ADHD[citation needed]. Such patients are treated in outpatient clinics, however it is unlikely that their medical insurance will pay for off label treatments. In the United Kingdom most chambers are financed by the National Health Service, although some, such as those run by Multiple Sclerosis Therapy Centres, are non-profit.

HBOT is controversial and health policy regarding its uses is politically charged. Both sides of the controversy on the effectiveness of HBOT is available in the form of PubMed and the Cochrane reviews[35] and a discussion of "Medical Polemics"[36][37], a discussion of Multiple Sclerosis in particular[38].

RE: Hyperaric oxygen to treat radiation side effects

by Gdpawel on Sat Dec 06, 2008 12:00 AM

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Hyperbaric Medicine Team Joins War On Cancer

The University of California, San Diego Medical Center's Hyperbaric Medicine
Center is part of a nationwide effort to compile and evaluate data in order to
validate whether cancer patients being treated for radiation-related wounds heal
more quickly and more thoroughly with hyperbaric oxygen therapy.

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/111502.php

 

 

RE: Hyperaric oxygen to treat radiation side effects

by Gdpawel on Sat Dec 06, 2008 12:00 AM

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Hyperbaric Medicine Team Joins War On Cancer

The University of California, San Diego Medical Center's Hyperbaric Medicine Center is part of a nationwide effort to compile and evaluate data in order to validate whether cancer patients being treated for radiation-related wounds heal
more quickly and more thoroughly with hyperbaric oxygen therapy.

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/111502.php

 

 

RE: Hyperaric oxygen to treat radiation side effects

by Gdpawel on Sat Dec 06, 2008 12:00 AM

Quote | Reply

Hyperbaric Medicine Team Joins War On Cancer

The University of California, San Diego Medical Center's Hyperbaric Medicine Center is part of a nationwide effort to compile and evaluate data in order to validate whether cancer patients being treated for radiation-related wounds heal more quickly and more thoroughly with hyperbaric oxygen therapy.

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/111502.php

 

 

RE: Hyperaric oxygen to treat radiation side effects

by Gdpawel on Sat Dec 06, 2008 12:00 AM

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It's good to see a resurgence of research into this
valuable technology. Radiation-induced necrosis is a serious reaction to whole
brain radiation treatment. It may result from the death of tumor cells and
associated reaction in surrounding normal brain or it may result from the
necrosis of normal brain tissue surrounding the previously treated metastatic
brain tumor.

The diagnosis of radiation-induced necrosis is difficult to
confirm. Many patients have a mixture of tumor and radiation necrosis and a
biopsy may be necessary to distinguish it. Neither symptoms nor radiographic
findings clearly distinguish radiation-induced necrosis from tumor. However, the
FDG-PET Scan and T1-SPECT studies are useful in differentiating
radiation-induced necrosis from recurrent tumor.

Hyperbaric Oxygen
Therapy (HBOT) is a useful therapeutic option for patients with confirmed
symptomatic radiation necrosis. Until the new millenium, the only treatment for
patients was pentoxifyline or heparin therapy, and it was almost always
unsuccessful. Both Duke University for Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy and the
University of Cincinnati previously had clinical trials on this science. The
most common condition treated at some Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy Centers is
tissue injury caused by brain radiation therapy for cancer.

Wound
healing requires oxygen delivery to the injured tissues. Radiation damaged
tissue has lost blood supply and is oxygen deprived. Chronic radiation
complications result from scarring and narrowing of the blood vessels within the
area which has received the treatment. Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy provides a
better healing environment and leads to the growth of new blood vessels in a
process called re-vascularization. It also fights infection by direct
bacteriocidal effects. Using hyperbaric treatment protocols, "most" patients
with chronic radiation injuries can be cured.

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy
is administered by delivering 100 percent oxygen at pressures greater than
atmospheric (sea level) pressure to a patient in an enclosed chamber. Hyperbaric
oxygen acts as a drug, eliciting varying levels of response at different
treatment depths, durations and dosages, and has been proven effective as
adjunctive therapy for specifically indicated conditions.

Oxygen is a
natural gas that is absolutely necessary for life and healing. Purified oxygen
is defined as a drug but is the most natural of all drugs. Oxygen under pressure
is still the same gas but is more able to penetrate into parts of the body where
the arterial flow is hindered, producing ischemia (loss of blood flow) and
hypoxia (lack of oxygen). When oxygen under pressure is breathed by a patient in
a sealed chamber, it is termed a hyperbaric oxygen treatment (HBOT).

In
addition to raising the arterial levels of oxygen 10 to 15 times higher than
that produced by normal atmospheric pressure, the pressure exerted within the
body can and does exert therapeutic benefits on acute and chronically
traumatized and swollen tissues.

Sources:

Hyperbaric Medicine
Service at UVA
Hyperbaric Medicine, John Muir Medical Center
Duke
University Center for Hyperbaric Medicine
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