Milk and cancer

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Milk and cancer

by jcr65566 on Mon Sep 08, 2008 12:00 AM

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Hi Its 4am in the morning I'm up because I cant stop coughing, and also I have very sore throat, but Im up because I Had some bad news yesterday I have a PSA test that I have done  every three months, my PSA gone up one point, it normally go’s down,  so I had to ask why what changed from last time, what changed is in the pawpaw smoothies I’m having a lot of milk and lately Iv been having cups of coffee with milk I don’t normally drink coffee it just some think I tried so I went and found out milk no good if you have prostrate cancer I found this site  http://www.vvv.com/healthnews/milk.html so I’m now off having milk in the food I eat and drink, I use to  like milk the thinks we have to give up just to stay alive Take care God be with you all  Ray  

 

This is only a small part of the article to see the rest go to the site address above

 

On January 23, 1998 researchers at the Harvard Medical School released a major study providing conclusive evidence that IGF-1 is a potent risk factor for prostate cancer. Should you be concerned? Yes, you certainly should, particularly if you drink milk produced in the United States.

IGF-1 or insulin-like growth factor 1 is an important hormone that is produced in the liver and body tissues. It is a polypeptide and consists of 70 amino acids linked together. All mammals produce IGF-1 molecules very similar in structure and human and bovine IGF-1 are completely identical. IGF-1 acquired its name because it has insulin-like activity in fat (adipose) tissue and has a structure that is very similar to that of proinsulin. The body's production of IGF-1 is regulated by the human growth hormone and peaks at puberty. IGF-1 production declines with age and is only about half the adult value at the age of 70 years. IGF-1 is a very powerful hormone that has profound effects even though its concentration in the blood serum is only about 200 ng/mL or 0.2 millionth of a gram per milliliter (1-4).

IGF-1 and cancer
IGF-1 is known to stimulate the growth of both normal and cancerous cells(2,5). In 1990 researchers at Stanford University reported that IGF-1 promotes the growth of prostate cells(2). This was followed by the discovery that IGF-1 accelerates the growth of breast cancer cells(6-8). In 1995 researchers at the National Institutes of Health reported that IGF-1 plays a central role in the progression of many childhood cancers and in the growth of tumours in breast cancer, small cell lung cancer, melanoma, and cancers of the pancreas and prostate(9). In September 1997 an international team of researchers reported the first epidemiological evidence that high IGF-1 concentrations are closely linked to an increased risk of prostate cancer(10). Other researchers provided evidence of IGF-1's link to breast and colon cancers(10,11).

The January 1998 report by the Harvard researchers confirmed the link between IGF-1 levels in the blood and the risk of prostate cancer. The effects of IGF-1 concentrations on prostate cancer risk were found to be astoundingly large - much higher than for any other known risk factor. Men having an IGF-1 level between approximately 300 and 500 ng/mL were found to have more than four times the risk of developing prostate cancer than did men with a level between 100 and 185 ng/mL. The detrimental effect of high IGF-1 levels was particularly pronounced in men over 60 years of age. In this age group men with the highest levels of IGF-1 were eight times more likely to develop prostate cancer than men with low levels. The elevated IGF-1 levels were found to be present several years before an actual diagnosis of prostate cancer was made(12).

The evidence of a strong link between cancer risk and a high level of IGF-1 is now indisputable. The question is why do some people have high levels while others do not? Is it all genetically ordained or could it be that diet or some other outside factor influences IGF-1 levels? Dr. Samuel Epstein of the University of Illinois is one scientist who strongly believes so. His 1996 article in the International Journal of Health Sciences clearly warned of the danger of high levels of IGF-1 contained in milk from cows injected with synthetic bovine growth hormone (rBGH). He postulated that IGF-1 in rBGH-milk could be a potential risk factor for breast and gastrointestinal cancers(13).

The milk connection
Bovine growth hormone was first synthesized in the early 1980s using genetic engineering techniques (recombinant DNA biotechnology). Small-scale industry-sponsored trials showed that it was effective in increasing milk yields by an average of 14 per cent if injected into cows every two weeks. In 1985 the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in the United States approved the sale of milk from cows treated with rBGH (also known as BST) in large-scale veterinary trials and in 1993 approved commercial sale of milk from rBGH-injected cows(13-16). At the same time the FDA prohibited the special labeling of the milk so as to make it impossible for the consumer to decide whether or not to purchase it(13).

Concerns about the safety of milk from BST-treated cows were raised as early as 1988 by scientists in both England and the United States(14,15,17-22). One of the main concerns is the high levels of IGF-1 found in milk from treated cows; estimates vary from twice as high to 10 times higher than in normal cow's milk(13,14,23). There is also concern that the IGF-1 found in treated milk is much more potent than that found in regular milk because it seems to be bound less firmly to its accompanying proteins(13). Consultants paid by Monsanto, the major manufacturer of rBGH, vigorously attacked the concerns. In an article published in the Journal of the American Medical Association in August 1990 the consultants claimed that BST-milk was entirely safe for human consumption(16,24). They pointed out that BST-milk contains no more IGF-1 than does human breast milk - a somewhat curious argument as very few grown-ups continue to drink mother's milk throughout their adult life. They also claimed that IGF-1 would be completely broken down by digestive enzymes and therefore would have no biological activity in humans(16). Other researchers disagree with this claim and have warned that IGF-1 may not be totally digested and that some of it could indeed make its way into the colon and cross the intestinal wall into the bloodstream. This is of special concern in the case of very young infants and people who lack digestive enzymes or suffer from protein-related allergies(13,14,20,22,25).

Researchers at the FDA reported in 1990 that IGF-1 is not destroyed by pasteurization and that pasteurization actually increases its concentration in BST-milk. They also confirmed that undigested protein could indeed cross the intestinal wall in humans and cited tests which showed that oral ingestion of IGF-1 produced a significant increase in the growth of a group of male rats - a finding dismissed earlier by the Monsanto scientists(25). The most important aspect of these experiments is that they show that IGF-1 can indeed enter the blood stream from the intestines - at least in rats.

Unfortunately, essentially all the scientific data used by the FDA in the approval process was provided by the manufacturers of rBGH and much of it has since been questioned by independent scientists. The effect of IGF-1 in rBGH-milk on human health has never actually been tested and in March 1991 researchers at the National Institutes of Health admitted that it was not known whether IGF-1 in milk from treated cows could have a local effect on the esophagus, stomach or intestines(26,27).

Whether IGF-1 in milk is digested and broken down into its constituent amino acids or whether it enters the intestine intact is a crucial factor. No human studies have been done on this, but recent research has shown that a very similar hormone, Epidermal Growth Factor, is protected against digestion when ingested in the presence of casein, a main component of milk(13,23,28). Thus there is a distinct possibility that IGF-1 in milk could also avoid digestion and make its way into the intestine where it could promote colon cancer(13,22). It is also conceivable that it could cross the intestinal wall in sufficient amounts to increase the blood level of IGF-1 significantly and thereby increase the risk of breast and prostate cancers(13,14).

The bottom line
Despite assurances from the FDA and industry-paid consultants there are now just too many serious questions surrounding the use of milk from cows treated with synthetic growth hormone to allow its continued sale. Bovine growth hormone is banned in Australia, New Zealand and Japan. The European Union has maintained its moratorium on the use of rBGH and milk products from BST-treated cows are not sold in countries within the Union. Canada has also so far resisted pressure from the United States and the biotechnology lobby to approve the use of rBGH commercially. In light of the serious concerns about the safety of human consumption of milk from BST-treated cows consumers must maintain their vigilance to ensure that European and Canadian governments continue to resist the pressure to approve rBGH and that the FDA in the United States moves immediately to ban rBGH-milk or at least allow its labeling so that consumers can protect themselves against the very real cancer risks posed by IGF-

RE: Milk and cancer

by mmsurvivor on Mon Sep 08, 2008 12:00 AM

Quote | Reply

Milk products have always been mucous forming. Man when weaned is not supposed to go back to milk.   I hope you keep your psa under control. If you ever need help Loma Linda University ,   Loma Linda CA( Along with MD Anderson and several others) offer Proton therapy for Prostate cancer. It is worth reading up on. When or if you had early stages it can easily be cured by this proceedure.  The only draw back, in my opinion, is the type of insurance needed. All the best and stay well.  MMS

On 9/8/2008 jcr65566 wrote:

Hi Its 4am in the morning I'm up because I cant stop coughing, and also I have very sore throat, but Im up because I Had some bad news yesterday I have a PSA test that I have done  every three months, my PSA gone up one point, it normally go’s down,  so I had to ask why what changed from last time, what changed is in the pawpaw smoothies I’m having a lot of milk and lately Iv been having cups of coffee with milk I don’t normally drink coffee it just some think I tried so I went and found out milk no good if you have prostrate cancer I found this site  http://www.vvv.com/healthnews/milk.html so I’m now off having milk in the food I eat and drink, I use to  like milk the thinks we have to give up just to stay alive Take care God be with you all  Ray  

 

This is only a small part of the article to see the rest go to the site address above

 

On January 23, 1998 researchers at the Harvard Medical School released a major study providing conclusive evidence that IGF-1 is a potent risk factor for prostate cancer. Should you be concerned? Yes, you certainly should, particularly if you drink milk produced in the United States.

IGF-1 or insulin-like growth factor 1 is an important hormone that is produced in the liver and body tissues. It is a polypeptide and consists of 70 amino acids linked together. All mammals produce IGF-1 molecules very similar in structure and human and bovine IGF-1 are completely identical. IGF-1 acquired its name because it has insulin-like activity in fat (adipose) tissue and has a structure that is very similar to that of proinsulin. The body's production of IGF-1 is regulated by the human growth hormone and peaks at puberty. IGF-1 production declines with age and is only about half the adult value at the age of 70 years. IGF-1 is a very powerful hormone that has profound effects even though its concentration in the blood serum is only about 200 ng/mL or 0.2 millionth of a gram per milliliter (1-4).

IGF-1 and cancer
IGF-1 is known to stimulate the growth of both normal and cancerous cells(2,5). In 1990 researchers at Stanford University reported that IGF-1 promotes the growth of prostate cells(2). This was followed by the discovery that IGF-1 accelerates the growth of breast cancer cells(6-8). In 1995 researchers at the National Institutes of Health reported that IGF-1 plays a central role in the progression of many childhood cancers and in the growth of tumours in breast cancer, small cell lung cancer, melanoma, and cancers of the pancreas and prostate(9). In September 1997 an international team of researchers reported the first epidemiological evidence that high IGF-1 concentrations are closely linked to an increased risk of prostate cancer(10). Other researchers provided evidence of IGF-1's link to breast and colon cancers(10,11).

The January 1998 report by the Harvard researchers confirmed the link between IGF-1 levels in the blood and the risk of prostate cancer. The effects of IGF-1 concentrations on prostate cancer risk were found to be astoundingly large - much higher than for any other known risk factor. Men having an IGF-1 level between approximately 300 and 500 ng/mL were found to have more than four times the risk of developing prostate cancer than did men with a level between 100 and 185 ng/mL. The detrimental effect of high IGF-1 levels was particularly pronounced in men over 60 years of age. In this age group men with the highest levels of IGF-1 were eight times more likely to develop prostate cancer than men with low levels. The elevated IGF-1 levels were found to be present several years before an actual diagnosis of prostate cancer was made(12).

The evidence of a strong link between cancer risk and a high level of IGF-1 is now indisputable. The question is why do some people have high levels while others do not? Is it all genetically ordained or could it be that diet or some other outside factor influences IGF-1 levels? Dr. Samuel Epstein of the University of Illinois is one scientist who strongly believes so. His 1996 article in the International Journal of Health Sciences clearly warned of the danger of high levels of IGF-1 contained in milk from cows injected with synthetic bovine growth hormone (rBGH). He postulated that IGF-1 in rBGH-milk could be a potential risk factor for breast and gastrointestinal cancers(13).

The milk connection
Bovine growth hormone was first synthesized in the early 1980s using genetic engineering techniques (recombinant DNA biotechnology). Small-scale industry-sponsored trials showed that it was effective in increasing milk yields by an average of 14 per cent if injected into cows every two weeks. In 1985 the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in the United States approved the sale of milk from cows treated with rBGH (also known as BST) in large-scale veterinary trials and in 1993 approved commercial sale of milk from rBGH-injected cows(13-16). At the same time the FDA prohibited the special labeling of the milk so as to make it impossible for the consumer to decide whether or not to purchase it(13).

Concerns about the safety of milk from BST-treated cows were raised as early as 1988 by scientists in both England and the United States(14,15,17-22). One of the main concerns is the high levels of IGF-1 found in milk from treated cows; estimates vary from twice as high to 10 times higher than in normal cow's milk(13,14,23). There is also concern that the IGF-1 found in treated milk is much more potent than that found in regular milk because it seems to be bound less firmly to its accompanying proteins(13). Consultants paid by Monsanto, the major manufacturer of rBGH, vigorously attacked the concerns. In an article published in the Journal of the American Medical Association in August 1990 the consultants claimed that BST-milk was entirely safe for human consumption(16,24). They pointed out that BST-milk contains no more IGF-1 than does human breast milk - a somewhat curious argument as very few grown-ups continue to drink mother's milk throughout their adult life. They also claimed that IGF-1 would be completely broken down by digestive enzymes and therefore would have no biological activity in humans(16). Other researchers disagree with this claim and have warned that IGF-1 may not be totally digested and that some of it could indeed make its way into the colon and cross the intestinal wall into the bloodstream. This is of special concern in the case of very young infants and people who lack digestive enzymes or suffer from protein-related allergies(13,14,20,22,25).

Researchers at the FDA reported in 1990 that IGF-1 is not destroyed by pasteurization and that pasteurization actually increases its concentration in BST-milk. They also confirmed that undigested protein could indeed cross the intestinal wall in humans and cited tests which showed that oral ingestion of IGF-1 produced a significant increase in the growth of a group of male rats - a finding dismissed earlier by the Monsanto scientists(25). The most important aspect of these experiments is that they show that IGF-1 can indeed enter the blood stream from the intestines - at least in rats.

Unfortunately, essentially all the scientific data used by the FDA in the approval process was provided by the manufacturers of rBGH and much of it has since been questioned by independent scientists. The effect of IGF-1 in rBGH-milk on human health has never actually been tested and in March 1991 researchers at the National Institutes of Health admitted that it was not known whether IGF-1 in milk from treated cows could have a local effect on the esophagus, stomach or intestines(26,27).

Whether IGF-1 in milk is digested and broken down into its constituent amino acids or whether it enters the intestine intact is a crucial factor. No human studies have been done on this, but recent research has shown that a very similar hormone, Epidermal Growth Factor, is protected against digestion when ingested in the presence of casein, a main component of milk(13,23,28). Thus there is a distinct possibility that IGF-1 in milk could also avoid digestion and make its way into the intestine where it could promote colon cancer(13,22). It is also conceivable that it could cross the intestinal wall in sufficient amounts to increase the blood level of IGF-1 significantly and thereby increase the risk of breast and prostate cancers(13,14).

The bottom line
Despite assurances from the FDA and industry-paid consultants there are now just too many serious questions surrounding the use of milk from cows treated with synthetic growth hormone to allow its continued sale. Bovine growth hormone is banned in Australia, New Zealand and Japan. The European Union has maintained its moratorium on the use of rBGH and milk products from BST-treated cows are not sold in countries within the Union. Canada has also so far resisted pressure from the United States and the biotechnology lobby to approve the use of rBGH commercially. In light of the serious concerns about the safety of human consumption of milk from BST-treated cows consumers must maintain their vigilance to ensure that European and Canadian governments continue to resist the pressure to approve rBGH and that the FDA in the United States moves immediately to ban rBGH-milk or at least allow its labeling so that consumers can protect themselves against the very real cancer risks posed by IGF-


 

RE: Milk and cancer

by Shemay on Mon Sep 08, 2008 12:00 AM

Quote | Reply
Excellent post Ray... I shall pass this information along to several family members who also have prostate cancer. I'm also curious to know why the "best before date" on dairy products nowdays is usually about a good month away from the purchase date. Used to be that milk and cream would sour within a week even when refrigerated. Hmmnnn! something else to Google I guess....... when I get a minute ... :0)

RE: Milk and cancer

by jcr65566 on Mon Sep 08, 2008 12:00 AM

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thanks for the reply see how I go Ray

RE: Milk and cancer

by jcr65566 on Mon Sep 08, 2008 12:00 AM

Quote | Reply

 

On 9/8/2008 Shemay wrote:

Excellent post Ray... I shall pass this information along to several family members who also have prostate cancer. I'm also curious to know why the "best before date" on dairy products nowdays is usually about a good month away from the purchase date. Used to be that milk and cream would sour within a week even when refrigerated. Hmmnnn! something else to Google I guess....... when I get a minute ... :0)

Thanks Shemay Iv been up most of the night trying to find out why, as it disturbed me a bit what put my PSA up that one point I looked at what I was doing that was  deferent from before the only thing I can find was I was having milk in the Paw Paw smoothies and I started having coffee with milk and no sugar so it must be the milk. I some times wish there was some way to link all these hostoric treatments to find the right ones that work I tryed the Pawpaw with just a banana and a cup of water it tast more like rotten scocks then before Looks like another creature comfort that I like that I have to give up take care and God bless Ray  

RE: Milk and cancer

by mmsurvivor on Thu Sep 11, 2008 12:00 AM

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Ray a little hint...You added sugar hmm not everyone agrees but sugar and milk are a bad combination (just my humble opinon) also you had bananas. That maybe a natural sugar but nonetheless it is also a lot of sugar. 10 tsp sugar in a banana. So it could be a combination of both. My doc will not let me eat them as I had liver problems in the past and he says the sugar load on the digestion is difficult.  Years ago I used to say "I must be allergic to bananas" Every time I ate one I was ill. So we are all different plus bananas (commercial) Used to be ripened with Gas not sure if they still do it.  MMS

On 9/8/2008 jcr65566 wrote:

 

On 9/8/2008 Shemay wrote:

Excellent post Ray... I shall pass this information along to several family members who also have prostate cancer. I'm also curious to know why the "best before date" on dairy products nowdays is usually about a good month away from the purchase date. Used to be that milk and cream would sour within a week even when refrigerated. Hmmnnn! something else to Google I guess....... when I get a minute ... :0)

Thanks Shemay Iv been up most of the night trying to find out why, as it disturbed me a bit what put my PSA up that one point I looked at what I was doing that was  deferent from before the only thing I can find was I was having milk in the Paw Paw smoothies and I started having coffee with milk and no sugar so it must be the milk. I some times wish there was some way to link all these hostoric treatments to find the right ones that work I tryed the Pawpaw with just a banana and a cup of water it tast more like rotten scocks then before Looks like another creature comfort that I like that I have to give up take care and God bless Ray  


 

RE: Milk and cancer

by trehouse60 on Thu Sep 11, 2008 12:00 AM

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I already told Ray this, but for the benefit of others following this thread:

an excellent alternative to cow's milk is brown rice milk.  very easy to make, and works well for every kind of substitution except perhaps just plain drinking a glass of milk  (if ya gotta have a glass of milk to drink - farm fresh raw cow's milk from grass fed cattle that do NOT get fed hormones, or even better yet, farm fresh organic raw goats milk. Soya milk should NOT be used for cancers that feed on hormones like breast cancer and prostate cancer.)

And brown rice milk is VERY rich in B-vitamins and some other cancer fighting goodies.

You can get the recipe here:

http://motherearthtreasurechest.blogspot.com/2008/09/buzzing

For anyone not familiar with cooking brown rice:  use 2 burners - one for high heat for initial boiling, the other on simmer heat for actual cooking

brown rice takes longer to cook and needs more water than white rice, so the proportions are 1 unit rice: 2 - 2 1/2 units water.  for the 3/4 cup raw rice in my recipe, you need to cook it in  1 1/2 to 2 cups water.  No salt, no butter or oil - just brown rice and pure water.  Put in saucepan uncovered and bring to boil on hot burner, stirring frequently.  When comes to full boil, remove pan to simmer burner and cover. Simmer for at least 12 minutes, but more likely 20, stirring very infrequently.  Rice is done when soft.  If all the water does not absorb, that is ok - put it in the blender with the rice.  If all the water absorbs before the rice is soft, add more water and put back on the hot burner stirring constantly until boiling, then cover and put back on simmer burner until done.

bon appetit!

Tre

RE: Milk and cancer

by jcr65566 on Fri Sep 12, 2008 12:00 AM

Quote | Reply

 

On 9/11/2008 trehouse60 wrote:

I already told Ray this, but for the benefit of others following this thread:

an excellent alternative to cow's milk is brown rice milk.  very easy to make, and works well for every kind of substitution except perhaps just plain drinking a glass of milk  (if ya gotta have a glass of milk to drink - farm fresh raw cow's milk from grass fed cattle that do NOT get fed hormones, or even better yet, farm fresh organic raw goats milk. Soya milk should NOT be used for cancers that feed on hormones like breast cancer and prostate cancer.)

And brown rice milk is VERY rich in B-vitamins and some other cancer fighting goodies.

You can get the recipe here:

http://motherearthtreasurechest.blogspot.com/2008/09/buzzing

For anyone not familiar with cooking brown rice:  use 2 burners - one for high heat for initial boiling, the other on simmer heat for actual cooking

brown rice takes longer to cook and needs more water than white rice, so the proportions are 1 unit rice: 2 - 2 1/2 units water.  for the 3/4 cup raw rice in my recipe, you need to cook it in  1 1/2 to 2 cups water.  No salt, no butter or oil - just brown rice and pure water.  Put in saucepan uncovered and bring to boil on hot burner, stirring frequently.  When comes to full boil, remove pan to simmer burner and cover. Simmer for at least 12 minutes, but more likely 20, stirring very infrequently.  Rice is done when soft.  If all the water does not absorb, that is ok - put it in the blender with the rice.  If all the water absorbs before the rice is soft, add more water and put back on the hot burner stirring constantly until boiling, then cover and put back on simmer burner until done.

bon appetit!

Tre


hi tre went into your blog that rice milk going to help me a lot Iv all ready had some feed back from my last post I just wish some people would cosider were dieing here to thanks Ray

RE: Milk and cancer

by jcr65566 on Fri Sep 12, 2008 12:00 AM

Quote | Reply

 

On 9/11/2008 mmsurvivor wrote:

Ray a little hint...You added sugar hmm not everyone agrees but sugar and milk are a bad combination (just my humble opinon) also you had bananas. That maybe a natural sugar but nonetheless it is also a lot of sugar. 10 tsp sugar in a banana. So it could be a combination of both. My doc will not let me eat them as I had liver problems in the past and he says the sugar load on the digestion is difficult.  Years ago I used to say "I must be allergic to bananas" Every time I ate one I was ill. So we are all different plus bananas (commercial) Used to be ripened with Gas not sure if they still do it.  MMS

On 9/8/2008 jcr65566 wrote:

 

On 9/8/2008 Shemay wrote:

Excellent post Ray... I shall pass this information along to several family members who also have prostate cancer. I'm also curious to know why the "best before date" on dairy products nowdays is usually about a good month away from the purchase date. Used to be that milk and cream would sour within a week even when refrigerated. Hmmnnn! something else to Google I guess....... when I get a minute ... :0)

Thanks Shemay Iv been up most of the night trying to find out why, as it disturbed me a bit what put my PSA up that one point I looked at what I was doing that was  deferent from before the only thing I can find was I was having milk in the Paw Paw smoothies and I started having coffee with milk and no sugar so it must be the milk. I some times wish there was some way to link all these hostoric treatments to find the right ones that work I tryed the Pawpaw with just a banana and a cup of water it tast more like rotten scocks then before Looks like another creature comfort that I like that I have to give up take care and God bless Ray  


 


Hi MMS I totally agree and your right just can understand why are they so nasty when we been having them for years  I use to love sugar and milk in my breakfast my cups of tea now I cant have it any more. I went off sugar when I first got diagnose when I went back on it my psa all most doubled sorry you cant have bananas I looked it up  your right about them to, so Il stay off them at the moment it making me a bit crabby because  Im having no sugar or fruit with sugar in it, I look up Banners ethylene gas can cause a pleasant odor, euphoria, nausea, hyperglycemia, a variety of psychological effects, and blood pressure so I see what you mean I found out  Fruit naturally gives off its own ethylene gas, but conventional bananas are sprayed with ethylene gas before being shipped out to retailers. This ensures they develop their bright yellow color right when they hit the shelves. Organic bananas are not sprayed as much. But there still sprayed is it only bananas you cant eat or is it other fruit to take care Ray  

RE: Milk and cancer

by Logicat on Sat Nov 01, 2008 12:00 AM

Quote | Reply

Tre,

I've never had brown rice water.  Matter of fact brown rice and even white rice is pretty foreign to me.  Sounds like I'm really missing something here.  But I do have one questions,  what is the purpose of using two burners? 

 

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