2005 73 yo male prostectoamy, radiation,lupron, advanced mestatic prostate cancer diagnosis , radiation , hots spots , orchiectomy 10 months later hot spots all over skeleton

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2005 73 yo male prostectoamy, radiation,lupron, advanced mestatic prostate cancer diagnosis , radiation , hots spots , orchiectomy 10 months later hot spots all over skeleton

by bajusbeach on Fri Oct 01, 2010 03:44 PM

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 2005 73 yo male prostectoamy, radiation,lupron,( 1 year and then would not do any more) advanced  mestatic  prostate cancer diagnosis (2009), radiation , hots spots ,orchiectomyDec2009) 10 months later  hot spots all over skeleton.  Sept. 2010) My dad  has gone through this in less than 5 years.   He now is being put on casodex. No  cancer in  organs or lymph nodes. I don't mean to be stupid and we have been supportive the whole way  with him at every step but   is he now condiered terminal and how long can he survive lke that . Can casodex make him really ill. I am  not sure and have been flying up to stay with him since this all began and want to  be aware before I go up agai and see if we need to have the other siblings see him when he is well. He will not do chemo or zometa

RE: 2005 73 yo male prostectoamy, radiation,lupron, advanced mestatic prostate cancer diagnosis , radiation , hots spots , orchiectomy 10 months later hot spots all over skeleton

by bulletlora on Mon Oct 11, 2010 02:18 PM

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On Oct 01, 2010 3:44 PM bajusbeach wrote:

 2005 73 yo male prostectoamy, radiation,lupron,( 1 year and then would not do any more) advanced  mestatic  prostate cancer diagnosis (2009), radiation , hots spots ,orchiectomyDec2009) 10 months later  hot spots all over skeleton.  Sept. 2010) My dad  has gone through this in less than 5 years.   He now is being put on casodex. No  cancer in  organs or lymph nodes. I don't mean to be stupid and we have been supportive the whole way  with him at every step but   is he now condiered terminal and how long can he survive lke that . Can casodex make him really ill. I am  not sure and have been flying up to stay with him since this all began and want to  be aware before I go up agai and see if we need to have the other siblings see him when he is well. He will not do chemo or zometa

I have been called by a patient who had Lupron and casodex. He was external beam radiation treated in 1993 and last time I talked to him he was age 72 and in good health. His PSA was 170 + and went to .5 in 2 years. You do not mention your PSA or Gleason score. Do you know it? these two drugs stop the cancer from feeding but radiation is needed to kill the cancer cells that do not know when to die. My prayers for you and yours, and may god bless. Has he had a bone scan to see if it has spread to bones? I agree with you on chemo as I would only have it done after severe symtoms are felt.

RE: 2005 73 yo male prostectoamy, radiation,lupron, advanced mestatic prostate cancer diagnosis , radiation , hots spots , orchiectomy 10 months later hot spots all over skeleton

by bajusbeach on Tue Oct 12, 2010 12:20 AM

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He had a recent bone scan adn the caancer psread to his bones last year . His recent bone scan  was showing spots all over his skeleton . His spine , skull all over. HIs psa was over 150 last time he went in . His gleason score was always 8

RE: 2005 73 yo male prostectoamy, radiation,lupron, advanced mestatic prostate cancer diagnosis , radiation , hots spots , orchiectomy 10 months later hot spots all over skeleton

by CDiaz481 on Mon Dec 27, 2010 01:12 PM

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Hey there,

I'm glad to see that you're sharing your journey with us. Casodex is part of hormone therapy. It works by cutting off the testosterone supply or "food" from the cancer. My hubby, Bill, 50 y/o, was on it for a little over a month along with Lupron and all of a sudden, things started getting out of control again. The doc immediately stopped casodex and had Bill take this drug called Dexamethasone to prep him for the next day's 1st chemotherapy session. It's nice because it's done right there in the oncologists office, not a hospital.

Men with Gleason scores of 8-10 are a bit rough to maintain a decent quality of life from what I've noticed, but it can be great at times. As you may already seen that Bill's Gleason is 10. He also just did his 13th chemo round (1 time every 3 weeks) and 14 will be done on the day after his birthday, Jan 5th (he will be 51).

We recently got news that there are no new mets, no bone mets, the tumors on his lymphnodes have all shrunk drastically...we couldn't ask for any better at this stage. If Bill wasn't on chemo, he wouldn't have made it this far. Yes, he has good days and has bad days, usually has bad days on the 3rd day after chemo is when it all hits him.

He gets some nausea, rarely he might vomit, SOMETIMES gets constipated, aches all over...but it's only for 1 day, then the 2nd day is kind of bad but not as bad as the 1st. To us, its a small price to pay for an overall decent quality of life. That's all that can be done with men at his diagnosis or similar. The higher the gleason, the more aggrssive the cancer and more likely it is to spread to the bones...and fast.

I strongly believe that if it wasn't for all these treatments, I would have lost him sometime in April when things started getting bad again. Right now his PSA is @ .2 and still Gleason 10/Stage 4 cancer, uncurable. I probly sound like a broken record, but at that diagnosis, its all about quality of life.

It amazes me on how sometimes people choose to not undergo these treatments even after surgeries. I hate to see men give up and let this disease take over their life. It makes it hard for loved ones and friends to see them in that condition. May I ask as to why he chose to not do chemo or Zometa?

In case you're wondering (hope the doc has explained it) how Zometa works:

Cancer cells that spread to the bone can secrete substances that can cause cells found in the bone called osteoclasts to dissolve or "eat away" a portion of the bone.  These tumors or lesions weaken the bone and can lead to complications.  Some of the complications resulting from this bone breakdown are bone pain, fractures and less commonly, hypercalcemia (increased levels of calcium in the blood).

Zometa is a bisphosphonate.  Bisphosphonate medications are used to slow down the osteoclast's effects on the bone.  In doing this it can be useful in slowing down or preventing the complications (bone pain, fractures, or high calcium levels) of the bone breakdown.

As for chemo, it basically helps to stop the spreading of cancer, yes, even if it has spread, any further. Bill and I look at it as a way to slow the clock that's ticking if you see what I'm getting at. We also learned that he will be on chemo for the rest of his life. That's a bit of a downer, BUT at least he can stay around longer! Keep in mind he's only 50 and will be 51 in Jan 4th. He's doing everything he can to be around for me and I do everything I can for him to help him out on his bad days.

I hope this has helped in some way. Take care,

Carla

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