NOTICE: As of June 15, this community will have a new web address: compass.cancerfighter.com. You will no longer be able to access the site at CancerCompass.com For more information, please read the full blog post.

 

Please Help me Help my Father.

24 Posts | Page(s): 1 2 3  Next 

Please Help me Help my Father.

by Hunter12140 on Wed Jul 12, 2006 12:00 AM

Quote | Reply
My Father is 62 years old and has had a high PSA since January 2006. One month it was 12 the next test was 3 and has been up and down ever since. Last week he had a biopsy and tonight we just found out that he has cancer. His glycemic number is between 6 and 7. We are very shocked and scared. I would really appreciate any information or advice anyone can give us. We aren't sure which treatments are the most effective and how to best handle the situation. I would be really grateful for any help that anyone can give me.

Your Father

by Patrick1 on Thu Jul 13, 2006 12:00 AM

Quote | Reply
The numbers you are reporting seem fairly moderate. It is possible he may have a good prognosis. You probably mean a GLEASON score of 6-7, not a "glycemic" score? My gleason score was 9-10 and I am still doing fine after 5 years. The key is: Is his PC confined to his prostate, or has it spread (metastisized). If it is confined to the prostate then a cure is possible. Then his best chance would be a prostatectomy (removal of the prostate). Other options include RT (radiation), HT (hormone therapy), watchful waiting, and some others. His urologist should explain all these options to him. It is a scary time when one is first diagnosed, but there is plenty of room for hope. I suggest that you and other family get on the internet and search "prostate cancer treatment" and related topics and really educate yourselves. It is often reassuring to have good information! Pat K

Prostate Cancer

by David_D_1 on Thu Jul 13, 2006 12:00 AM

Quote | Reply
Before submitting to any of the conventional treatments I would advise using the search engines to research this. If interested in alternative treatments, check out the flaxseed oil treatment. Reasearch Johanna Budwig, Beckwith, Henderson and others and read, read, read. Using this method of finding out about the problem will give you more hope and confidence. May God Bless You and Your Dad!

Helping Your Father

by Paulh on Thu Jul 13, 2006 12:00 AM

Quote | Reply
You sound like my daughter when I was diagnosed last week with early stage1 Prostate Cancer. I am gattering a lot of information regarding treatments. Since my Gleason number is 6(3+3), another Dr. recommended I look into Proton Theropy. You can check it out on the internet. The hospital is Loma Linda Hospital in California. I would suggest that you check out all the treatments, like I'm doing, and find the one that your father and doctor are most comfortable with. I also am on a lot of prayer lists and will be prayed over by the Pastor and elders of my church. Prayers do help and I will lift your dad up in prayer also. God Bless your whole family.

Thank You

by Hunter12140 on Sat Jul 15, 2006 12:00 AM

Quote | Reply
I have printed all of these messages out and given them to my Dad. They have really helped him to realize that there are alot of people out there in the same situation he is. I really appreciate all your advise. It has helped us more than you will ever know. Thanks again, I will keep you in my prayers.

Help For Your Father

by Farah1432000 on Wed Jul 19, 2006 12:00 AM

Quote | Reply
Hello, I am not a MD, however, i am the Director of operations for a medical assistance company that facilitates in all kinds of surgeries. In reply to the best possible treatment for prostate cancer. The best treatment is the implantation of Cesium 131, which there are MINIMAL doctors that can perform this procedure with such ease and intelligence.I would recommend Brachytherapy. That is a technique to implant radioactive seeds directly into the prostate gland to treat early tumors. PLease contact me directly if you or a loved one has prostate cancer, and need urgent help, I will surely counsel and bring you the utmost care. -- Message edited by CancerCompass staff: for personal protection, email address removed. Please review CancerCompass Member Guidelines at http://www.cancercompass.com/common/guidelines.html ---- St. Mary Mercy Hospital located in Livonia, Michigan is one of the premier prostate brachytherapy centers in the country. The Doctor his name is Omar Majid MD, a board certified Radiation oncologist for about 25 years....has by far the largest in quatity and volumne in the U.S. He is the ONLY Doctor that is skillful and prosperous to perform this procedure for the seed Cesium-131. From observation and testimony's of his patients, this will be done in about 1 hour time, 1 hour post op recovery, and on an outpatient basis, minimal discomfort....his skill and quality care even gives them a chance to go play golf the next day with out any discomfort. :) -- Message edited by CancerCompass staff: for personal protection, email address removed. Please review CancerCompass Member Guidelines at http://www.cancercompass.com/common/guidelines.html ----

Prostate Cancer

by RobertBob_H on Thu Jul 20, 2006 12:00 AM

Quote | Reply
Your dad's numbers (Gleason of 6/7) look "good." If he has to have prostate cancer, those are the numbers to have. One thing that hasn't been mentioned yet is finding a support group in your community. I facilitate a Man to Man Prostate Cancer Support Group which is co-sponsored by the American Cancer Society and USTOO, an international prostate cancer education and support group (www.ustoo.org). I have men in my group who have had most of the treatments...surgery, including robotic assisted surgery, seed implants (radiation) and high dose radiation (temporary implants), proton treatment at Loma Linda, cryotherapy (freezing the prostate), watchful waiting and hormone therapy for a rising PSA after treatment (12 years ago). A distinct advantage of visiting a support group is the ability to converse with men who have been through different treatments. They have a perspective that "most" doctors don't have...they have "experience" with their treatment. My men are ready and willing to share, understanding that the information they give might help the newly diagnosed man determine which treatment he feels is best for him. And...your dad will probably have to decide on HIS OWN TREATMENT. My guess is that his urologist will explain what each treatment is like along with its possible side effects, but basically leave the final decision up to your dad. With all the different forms of treatment the men in my group had, they all went through some side effects, but all are still alive and enjoying life. I, personally (with my wife's input), chose surgery because I was comparatively young (64) and wanted to have radiation available as an option if surgery failed. Sometimes one's other health problems, a high Gleason score or age eliminate certain forms of treatment from consideration. We are fortunate at this time to have so many treatment options available. There is no way I would tell your dad which treatment to have. Others, if they are truly being helpful, will simply share their personal experience with their treatment of choice and let your dad take it from there. Oh, the other great thing about support groups: we actually see men who are surviving prostate cancer!

Prostate Cancer

by Danny47 on Wed Jul 26, 2006 12:00 AM

Quote | Reply
Still struggling with the few options I believe I have to deal with PC. Was diagosed 18 months ago. Got all the bad new over the course of one month: PC, Gleason-9, PSA 39, metastatic (in hip bones). Since then have been on Lupron (ev 3 months), daily Casodex, and (until last month) Zometa to deal with potential bone issues. My dr. stopped the Zometa based on osteonecrosis issues with too many patients. The HT has kept my PSA down to undetect. level. Of course, waiting for the first rise. Was 57 when the ordeal began. Am confident in my Oncol. but hope to find "chatting" with others in my situation will be enlightening. Am considering Intermittent HT but not sure since 2 doctors have given conflicting recommendations. Similar situation with stopping the Casodex; same conflicting opinions. Still not sure which way to turn. But I feel good most of the time and enjoy the support of my family (it may even be more difficult for them). Can deal with the occasional bone pain, hot flashes and depression. Is there a reputable source of data to help guide me?

Thanks For The Advice.

by Hunter12140 on Wed Jul 26, 2006 12:00 AM

Quote | Reply
thank you very much for the advice my father really appreciates it. he said that his doctor told him he wasn't eligible for the seeds because his gleason score was above a 5. i appreciate your help. if you have any other information your input will be greatly appreciated. thanks again, kelley

Prostate Cancer

by RobertBob_H on Wed Jul 26, 2006 12:00 AM

Quote | Reply
Kelley, I'm going to give you a very interesting web site "down under" as in Australia. The web site is: www.yananow.net. It stands for You Are Not Alone Now. When you get to the Home Page, click on "If you are a returning visitor"... On the next page click on "Treatment Charts"... Then scroll down to "Chart sorted by Gleason Score" and click on it. This page will give you tons of information about men who have undergone prostate cancer treatment...their PSA scores; Gleason scores; type of treatment plus followup treatment if necessary AND their personal stories. You will find that even men with Gleason scores of 9 have had "seeds" and survived. Find Jack Hudspeth and read his story, for instance. There is much more valuable information on that site...just go exploring. If your dad wants to explore "seeds" further, he should ask to speak with a radiation oncologist if he hasn't already.I have men in my group who have had "seed" implants and I'm not aware of any who have had a Gleason score of 5. The comment that the doctor made was the first time I have heard that treatment being based solely (it seems) on the Gleason score. Getting information on treatment that others have had is one of the real advantages of finding a support group. You can find on the same web site a long list of questions for all the different doctors/ specialists your dad may encounter in his search for the "right" treatment. Hopefully, you (or someone else close to him) will always go with him to his doctor visits and ask why, why, why until you are satified. He should get all the information he needs in order to decide on the treatment of HIS choice...then do it! My best wishes to your dad and family. Bob p.s. Have you visited www.ustoo.org?
24 Posts | Page(s): 1 2 3  Next 
Subscribe to this message board discussion

Latest Messages

View More

We care about your feedback. Let us know how we can improve your CancerCompass experience.