Food aversion

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RE: Food aversion

by laprice on Fri Feb 20, 2015 07:35 PM

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There was just a 2015 scientific study done about food aversions and mineral content. You might want to try consuming some broths with good concentrations of zinc and other minerals in it. Making a fresh broth probably is best. A couple of other tricks that you might have tried to decrease the dirty sock taste: rinsing your mouth with cold water before eating, or a diluted baking soda rinse, if you can tolerate these. The other little amino acid that has been study by oncology nurses for food aversion is L-glutamine. You might want to look in the literature and/or see a nutritionist regarding these things. I hope that helps.

 

RE: Food aversion

by redwards on Sat Feb 21, 2015 03:21 AM

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Reading all these posts just reminds me how cancer treatments violate "first do no harm" in 2015. I can't imagine the torture you've all been through. I lost my brother to the treatments for Tonsil cancer not the  cancer itself. After "orthodox medicine" declared him stage 4 and threw in the towel I put him on "Cellect/Budwig Protocol and got rid of his stage 4 cancer that had metastasized to his brain. 2 scans proved it. He died from a fall that fractured his skull "cancer free". I say all this to say there is a much better way and "do no harm"

RE: Food aversion

by Sdurnell on Sat Feb 21, 2015 06:35 AM

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Redwards,

It's a tradeoff for most of us, and we have to weigh the benefits against the very real, but unknowable ahead of time, possible negative effects.  

Not everybody gets the same quality or amount of information before they are asked to made decisions that will affect their current and future health, and that is a sad state of affairs.

But I am happy with my treatment and can accept the permanent effects I live with from it as a small price to pay for the gift of life.  And I so appreciate my doctors who ensured that I was well informed.

Susan

RE: Food aversion

by augustus on Sat Feb 21, 2015 05:30 PM

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Thank you everyone for the replies. This site never fails to deliver. I head to Houston tomorrow for an MRI and neck scan this week to see how well we did on the treatements. Redwards, I understand your sentiment, but I read and asked a lot of questions before going the route I did. I agree treatment has to get better, but they are making some progress. I am proof in the pudding, as while I have some significant side effects, they are not as sever as those that went through this a few years ago. 

RE: Food aversion

by Sdurnell on Sun Feb 22, 2015 02:41 AM

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Not that many years ago a diagnosis of throat cancer was a death sentence.  They could remove tonsils, but that was pretty much it.  Our 18th president, U.S. Grant, died of it in the 1880's (his actual cause of death was starvation).  If you're a history buff read the account of his friendship with Mark Twain, hill illness, and the writing of his memoirs and Huckleberry Finn in "Grant and Twain:  The Story of a Friendship that Changed America" by Mark Perry.

My great grandfather also died of throat cancer in 1927, a long, slow death.  I am happy with the sate of treatment, as imperfect as it is, and will welcome any improvements in the future.  They are refining the protocols all the time.

Susan

RE: Food aversion

by augustus on Wed Feb 25, 2015 11:44 AM

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I had my first post treatment scan and it is clear. Every 3 months for a year, then twice a year. Modern medicine is serving me well. My nutritionist and swallowing tech gave me some more tips yesterday and i was able to start on some soft solid foods last night. Potato soup and roast. The goal is to get off the tube at my next 3 month visit. Susan, just finished the book on Grant and Twain. I am a history buff and civil war reader. Grant was a lot tougher man than me. Thanks for the recommendation. 

RE: Food aversion

by Sdurnell on Wed Feb 25, 2015 10:44 PM

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Augustus,

So glad someone took my recommendation and enjoyed the book.  I found it fascinating.  Grant was a tough guy, all right, and I'm not just talking about his ability to lead the troops!  Now I need to read his memoirs, which are said to be the best example of this genre ever written by an American.

AND great news about your scan! And about eating!  You are on your way!  Congratulations.

Susan

RE: Food aversion

by CheyenneMoon on Mon Mar 09, 2015 10:44 PM

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On Feb 17, 2015 3:00 PM augustus wrote:

 It has been over 8 weeks since my last radiation for stage 4 tonsil cancer.  I have no throat pain and I am physically able to swallow liquids and solids. I developed a mental issue with food, after being sick several times after eating, during my chemo and radiation treatments. Of course my mouth is dry and my taste buds are damaged. I can drink smoothies with fruit and high protien liquid in them with little issue. They taste ok some days; never good; and like dirty socks on other days.  I do at least 2 of these a day. I use a feeding tube for the remainder of my nutrition. I can also eat small servings of sliced fruit and it has some taste.  I have eaten some solid food; french toast, cream of wheat, scrambled eggs. But not consistently. They taste like dirty socks, and the texture tries to trigger a gag relex. I have not tried eggs or toast in a few weeks now. I watch cooking shows like Diners Drive Ins and dives. They have lots of burgers and comfort food. It looks great and makes me wish I could eat that kind of food again.  But I can not come close to putting food like that in my mouth without getting nauseaus. I was not previously a picky eater and have no food aversions prior to cancer treatment. It seems most people, if physically able, start eating sooner than I am. Their taste buds might now be back, but they seem to be able to eat more solid foods than I am doing. Any advise and will I get back to eating meat and potatoes again? 

LOL Augustus, I watched the same Diners Drive Ins and dives. I have a list of places to try out. Two months out of treatment I was able to begin to taste. Most things sound unappealing to me until I eat it. My problem is that I was a fruit and salad girl till this happend as I have to watch my sodium levels due to Meniere's disease. I am starting to eat a little of both but anything that is appealing is not very healthy and very salty. I am having good luck with seafood from Red Lobster(expensive) and Captain D's. I had to stop using my tube and protien drinks as my body rejects it. I try everything! It is very important to get over the aversion to food. There was a gentleman that was cured but his doctor put him with hospice because he won't try to eat. Red meat is about the last things you will be able to eat. I can do a hamburger steak with gravy or sometimes I buy a cheeseburger and eat just the burger. I have to sip room temp drinks when I eat to help it go down. You will get there. I was so afraid that I would be one of those people that would never eat again but I am. Hang in there and just keep trying. Like I said, nothing ever sounds appealing to me until I put it in my mouth. Oh and I can only swallow down my right side as the treated side still doesn't work to good. Chew every thing really well and take your time.

RE: Food aversion

by cancercathy on Tue Mar 10, 2015 12:45 AM

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On Feb 18, 2015 11:55 PM Terrance wrote:

Augustus,

My Oncology dentist suggested brushing my tongue three times a day for 30 days. Brush the old dead taste buds at the back of the tongue. About 30 strokes each time. He said that the results you get will be about the same as if you did nothing for a year. Thirty days after I started this, my taste buds were nearly back to normal, whereas everything other than scrambled eggs just tasted nasty. Now, things are nearly normal again as far as my taste is concerned.

Great advice.  I couldn't have said it better.  Good luck.  Cancercathy?

RE: Food aversion

by cancercathy on Tue Mar 10, 2015 12:46 AM

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On Feb 18, 2015 11:55 PM Terrance wrote:

Augustus,

My Oncology dentist suggested brushing my tongue three times a day for 30 days. Brush the old dead taste buds at the back of the tongue. About 30 strokes each time. He said that the results you get will be about the same as if you did nothing for a year. Thirty days after I started this, my taste buds were nearly back to normal, whereas everything other than scrambled eggs just tasted nasty. Now, things are nearly normal again as far as my taste is concerned.

Great advice.  I couldn't have said it better.  Good luck.  Cancercathy?

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